Posts Tagged ‘twilight’

sidewinder’s picks: The Top 10 Fannish Events of 2009

December 21st, 2009

In the spirit of the season, I decided to look back on 2009 and reflect on what I saw as the Top 10 fannish news stories, events, and kerfluffles of the past year. These are just my picks–what news stories and events did you think were the biggest? I’d be curious to hear other opinions and reflections from different corners of fandom.

10. The 2009 Warnings Debate. Warning debates seem to rise up every year, but the 2009 one was a real doozy. Taking place after a bandom story was posted without warnings, the debate quickly spread through LiveJournal media fandom as everyone took sides on the issue–and a few BNFs found themselves on the “wrong” side of the debate. Still, the debate brought serious discussion of triggers to the forefront, and I have noticed more people being sensitive to the use of–or warning for their lack of use of–warnings on their fic, as well as on general journal postings since then.

9. Dreamwidth Studios launches. After much discussion and anticipation in some circles for months, Dreamwidth Studios finally opened to the public in May of 2009. Initially there was a huge frenzy of support and excitement, with some members of media fandom abandoning (or having already abandoned after getting beta accounts) their LiveJournals for this new service. There was a fair-sized backlash against DW as well, with others content to stay where they were, annoyed by the fracturing of their reading lists and doubtful that fandom would pack up en masse to move to this new service. Time has proven the doubters, perhaps, to be correct. Recently some DW users have been posting about moving back to LJ as the community on DW had not taken off as they had hoped it would, and their corners of fandom are still largely staying where they were on LJ.

8. SurveyFail. Rarely has a metamob so quickly and so effectively shut a person down than when fandom went after “researcher” (and reality-tv “celebrity”) Ogi Ogas. Fandom doesn’t like to be conned or tricked, especially when it comes to media representations of slash fiction fans and writers. SurveyFail was a prime example of this.

7. The Eli Roth saga of doom. Celebrities are increasingly breaking the fourth wall with their fandoms in this internet age, and services like Twitter make that easier than ever to do. But this isn’t always a good thing, as Eli Roth proved when he started interacting with members of the gossip community ohnotheydidnt. Joking about slash fiction featuring his characters and posting pictures of him eating blueberries morphed one night into women (some potentially underage) sending him topless pictures of themselves and engaging in cybersex via MySpace. The incident sent ONTD into a tailspin of wank and lead many to wonder just how far is too far to go when fandom and celebrities mix on-line.

6. Jon and Kate divorce. The reality series Jon and Kate Plus 8 has been a mainstay of sites such as ONTD and the gossip magazines since the series first aired. Spurring lots of fan sites (as well as anti-fan sites), as the couple’s relationship hit the rocks this year, discussion and interest about them exploded on the internet. Here on FanHistory we saw a peak in traffic to our page about the show in August, as this news was breaking.

5. Russet Noon and LadySybilla. Never before in fandom history–and probably never again–had FanHistory, Fandom_wank, and Lee Goldberg found themselves on the same side of the fence: recording the history of (and mocking) a Twilight fan’s attempt to profit off a fan-written novel based in the Twilight universe. This massive kerfluffle exploded as the author, LadySybilla, targeted her critics in kind.

4. The Philadelphia Eagles sign Michael Vick. Despite having a baseball team make it to the World Series two years in a row, Philadelphia is still a football town, first and foremost. And the announcement that Michael Vick would be added to the team’s roster this season was a news story that rocked the city and outraged many fans. It was an especially difficult pill to swallow after the loss of fan favorite player, Brian Dawkins. The debate ran for months–and still continues today, even as the team heads to the playoffs: Should Vick really have been given a second chance? What are fans to do if they love a team, yet have strong moral objections to a player on it? Some sold their tickets for the season in protest; others came around to accepting Vick later in the year. Others still just wait and hope he will be traded away next season so they can go back to rooting for their team without guilt.

3. Star Trek, Rebooted. The release of the new Star Trek film this year managed to revitalize the fandom in a way that surprised and delighted many. Fans of the original series who were initially skeptical by and large embraced the film. The fandom exploded on LiveJournal, producing a huge array of fanworks in a short span of time. However, there was some wank and shipping wars to develop, largely between Kirk/Spock shippers and Spock/Uhura shippers. How this will continue as the new movie franchise moves on will be interesting to see.

2. Michael Jackson‘s death. It was the news story that nearly took down the internet: Michael Jackson, dead at 50. Many websites and social networking services temporarily crashed or were overloaded as people flocked on-line for news and updates. His passing lead many to reconsider the popstar’s life and works, fueling renewed debates over his behavior and legal troubles. It also lead to the formation of numerous new messageboards, communities, and websites devoted to him, and a blossoming interest in Michael Jackson fan-fiction.

1. Race Fail 2009. Unquestionably, RaceFail was THE fandom story (and debate) of the year. Beginning in January over a book by Elizabeth Bear, the situation exploded and raged heavily through science fiction and media fandom for months. Indeed, it would be easy to say that 2009 was basically a Year of Fail, as I speculated back in July in a previous blog post. Increased awareness of race, gender and ability privilege have been promoted again and again as failings have been pointed out, both in commercial media such as books and films and in our own fannish interactions with each other.

So what does that say for the year ahead? How will 2010 go down in the fannish history books? Guess we’ll have to wait until next December to find out.

Developing communities on smaller wikis

September 8th, 2009

I originally wrote this for another purpose. I thought it might be interesting to people on my FList in regards to how we run Fan History, how we have gone about doing certain things, what has worked and what hasn’t worked. This has been slightly modified to be more applicable for a wider audience.

Fan History, like other small wikis and multifandom projects, has had a problem with community identity. Most of our contributors don’t as Fan History community members or members of fandom. Instead, they identify as say Batman fans, Harry Potter fans, Twilight fans. This is a problem that we have been working to solve, even as we try to increase identity and participation inside those specific communities. We’ve been most successful at creating identity by doing two things: Having content that interests people that is not specific to any one fan community and by creating large amounts of content that help demonstrate the size and scope of the whole fan community. We’ve found that both solutions, in terms of content development, have been rather successful. Fan History has covered several fandom kerfluffles that have brought brand awareness. The kerfluffles cross fandom lines in terms of interest, principally due to the large number of people involved. Fan History also has worked to improve our definition pages. These articles connect fandoms by offering definitions from different communities, give examples from across fandom and link to panfannish discussions regarding the terms. People can really begin to see how various fandoms are connected. As a result of these kerfluffles and terminology articles, our visitors have poked around a fair amount. We’ve also blown out our content, going from representing roughly 3,000 fandoms a year ago to representing over 36,000 now. We’ve added a over 25,000 articles about specific pieces of fan fiction, added over 50,000 articles about episodes of television, and added over 50,000 articles about LiveJournal community users. All of these articles have helped the fan community understand that Fan History is for them, that it covers topics that are relevant to them, that it is easy to plug in their own knowledge in to our framework with out fear. Both of these strategies have been successful in their own ways. Definition and kerfluffles ways have helped foster a greater sense of fannish community in the whole of the fannish community. They have helped to increase our traffic and our brand identity. Blowing out our content has not necessarily been as successful in terms of fostering community development inside and outside the wiki. It has helped some with our brand identity and it has with our conversion rates in getting people to contribute to the wiki. These solutions, going hand in hand, have really been successful for us.

Beyond content development, we’ve tried several things to encourage community development and to increase the number of edits that an individual makes. For a while, we tried to welcome new members and individually thank IP addresses that contributed to Fan History. We also tried barn stars. These strategies weren’t very successful in terms of converting a one time or occasional editor in to a regular editor. Our admin team discussed the situation, brain stormed ideas where we could be more effective at community building and helping our contributors; in response, we changed tactics. Our policy became to look more closely at specific edits and monitor for certain types and then respond to offer assistance that addresses those edits. One example involves articles about fan fiction writers. In some cases, they have changed their pen names. When we see edits that indicate that they have changed their names, we offer to help them do that or see clarification as to what they are trying to do. We have found that doing to leads to additional edits to an article to improve it once those changes are made and that the individual will frequently come back to more regularly update the article.

When you’re working on a wiki with a small community, you frequently know the one or two other contributors. You were might have brought them on board. It can sometimes be easier to just send them an IM, a text message, drop them an e-mail. This was a problem that we were occassionally facing on Fan History. Our admin team has become rather close. We often feel like we know what other admins are thinking and respond accordingly. We’ve discussed how this can be bad for a wiki. Our communication channels are not transparent when we do that. It might appear like our admin team is a clique, where our first goal is to maintain our status on the wiki and in the wider fan community. The team made a commitment to using talk pages to discuss all manner of things that we are doing. This includes how to avoid drama that may reflect poorly on us, what sort of content we want to develop, issues with templates, where we need a bot to be run to fix spelling or categorization issues and more. We tried to make sure that in discussions with contributors that more administrators were engaging the community. We tried to balance that so it wouldn’t look like we were dog piling on our contributors. This has been rather successful. Our engagement on the wiki has help our community relations outside the wiki because people can see what we are doing, have the tools to more fairly evaluate our decision making processes and members of the broader fannish community feel like they can approach on wiki or off to deal with concerns that they may have regarding our content. It has also helped internally by improving our communications with users, by making it easier to implement contributor feedback and by fostering a sense of internal community.

Wikis tend to need to define the size and scope of their mission, how to create content to meet their mission, policy creation and how they will enforce their policies. Much of this involves internal decision making that will have an impact on external factors. If the scope is too big, it will be hard to develop content or make the project feel overwhelming. If it is too small, the wiki may turn into a pet project that doesn’t have a large possible pool of contributors to draw from. If they create content with complex templates when they are first starting off, that may prove a barrier to entry for some people who read the content. If the wiki policy is too restrictive, people may not feel like they can contribute because they don’t want to break the rules, understand complex categorization policies or how to create stub articles that are acceptable. If it is too open, there is the potential for a lot of drama as people seek to dominate in certain places by sheer force of will. These are issues that we’ve been working on with Fan History. We’ve worked on policies with both the internal community and external community in mind. The point of the policies has always been to serve the community that exists on the wiki, to serve the information and make it as best as we can, and to be accessible and culturally appropriate when dealing with external critics. For content, we defined our scope and then went the automated route to create stub content to make it clear where the borders of our scope was. According to occasional contributors we’ve surveyed informally, it made the wiki feel less scary as they had base content to start from and they had many examples they could pull from regarding what is acceptable and what is not acceptable. For policy, we made a point of having policy discussions on the wiki and rationalizing those steps so that future wiki users could understand our thought processes. While a well developed community of users does not exist, we went outside the community to our acquaintances who were occasional editors. We surveyed their opinions, incorporated their comments in to our discussion. We invited them to participate in the discussion on the wiki. We also listened to external criticism regarding policies and incorporated that feedback as we developed our policy. The results of this that we are the most proud of involve our deletion policy found at http://www.fanhistory.com/wiki/Help:Article_deletion . Community develop on wikis for ones that don’t have the good fortune to go viral is hard. This is a lesson that we’ve learned at Fan History.

It takes a great deal of work to be successful. It can be especially challenging to build a community because for wikis, it is often easy to overlook community aspects because wikis so often focus on content. We’ve learned that it takes building content with the idea of how random contributors will feel comfortable editing, actively engaging contributors in a way that will solicit a response, being transparent in terms of what the admin team is doing to avoid feelings of cliques, making organizational patterns easy to understand so as not to confuse your contributor base, not being too harsh when enforcing policies, and thinking about what your internal community building will mean in the wider community that your wiki is part of. We hope that you can take our lessons and learn from them as you develop a community on your own wiki.

New Moon soundtrack campaigning continues!

July 14th, 2009

Well, despite my initial pessimism (as expressed in an earlier blog post here), apparently campaigning to get on the “New Moon” movie soundtrack is a big, big thing right now for numerous band and musician fandoms. With the huge success of Twilight, everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon and get their favorite artist some extra exposure. And a news article about this in the Examiner names Fiction Plane fans as “the most dedicated” in their pursuit of getting one of the band’s songs on the soundtrack.

So, color me a bit surprised! But I still wonder, will the campaigning really pay off? Now more than ever I’m curious to see what happens…

Using Twilight to promote another fandom?

June 30th, 2009

This morning I received an interesting email from one of the fan groups for Fiction Plane, an alt/rock-group which has been around for a number of years of which I am a moderate follower. Fiction Plane opened for The Police on the first half of their world tour in 2007-2008, perhaps not unsurprising given one of the members of the group, Joe Sumner, is Sting‘s son. While that tour did manage to boost their visibility to the public, it didn’t really do much to get them on the charts or bring them widespread success, at least here in the U.S. where they maintain a loyal, but not especially large following.

Well, some fans are trying to think of creative ways to promote them, especially with a new album due out later this year. And what they’re proposing is a campaign to get a Fiction Plane song on the soundtrack for the next Twilight movie, “New Moon”. They’ve created a Facebook page for the campaign as well as having a thread about it on one of the main fan sites.

Undoubtably, the widespread phenomenon that is Twilight brought a big boost to the popularity of the bands featured on the soundtrack of the first movie. When I looked at statistics for the Twilight last.fm group earlier this year, many of the most popular artists within that fan community were those featured on the soundtrack album. That said, are the demographics for Twilight compatible really with Fiction Plane fans? I’m not sure. My experience is that FP fans tend to skew older. They’re not so much a band that appeals greatly to the teen, tween, and young adult crowd the way Twilight does. I don’t know that I would hear their music being really compatible on a soundtrack with, say Paramore. But, I could be seriously mistaken on that, so who knows.

I think, more importantly, Fiction Plane fans need to come up with a serious plan if they want to make this happen. An on-line Facebook group isn’t going to do the trick, and as the film is due this November I would have to imagine much of the negotiation for soundtrack music may already be long completed (perhaps they’d be better aiming for “Eclipse”?) Petition drives can be effective but only when well organized and focused on the proper individuals — and truly huge in volume. Big enough to get media coverage. The cynical part of me is far too convinced that getting on the soundtrack for a sure-to-be blockbuster like “New Moon” is something that takes a good deal of record company and corporate dealings and is driven by demographic studies far more than fan-driven efforts. That said, I wish them well — I just hope these fans don’t get too disappointed if they find that a grass roots campaign like this is up against huge entertainment industry hurdles.

What was hot on Fan History for the week of June 7 to June 13, 2009

June 15th, 2009

It’s another week and I’m in the mood for another post about what’s popular on Fan History. This edition includes our most popular traffic sources outside search, our most popular articles and our most popular keyword based searches for the week of June 7 to June 13, 2009.

Most popular articles
11,848 pages were viewed a total of 44,012 times

  1. Draco/Hermione – 920 times
  2. Cassandra Claire – 551 times
  3. Race Fail 2009 – 423 times
  4. Torchsong Chicago – 383 times
  5. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive – 323 times
  6. AdultFanFiction.Net – 282 times
  7. Digimon – 226 times
  8. Hurt/comfort – 225 times
  9. Naruto – 225 times
  10. Twilight – 216 times

Coming in Number 11 is Russet Noon with 206 and FanFiction.Net with 204.

Top non-search referrers
Referring sites sent 2,620 visits via 361 sources

  1. journalfen.net – blog entry about conventions is where the traffic was from – 298 visits
  2. animenewsnetwork.com – 287 visits
  3. chickipedia.com – 232 visits
  4. community.livejournal.com – 179 visits
  5. twitter.com – 83 visits
  6. twilighted.net – 81 visits
  7. fanfiction.net – 79 visits
  8. deviantart.com – 67 visits
  9. tvtropes.org – 61 visits
  10. fanpop.com – 57 visits

Coming in at referer rank 77 was russet-noon.com with 4 visits.

Search key phrases
Search sent 12,029 total visits via 8,537 keywords

  1. naruto wiki – 64 visits
  2. adultfanfiction – 60 visits
  3. galbadia hotel – 53 visits
  4. restricted section – 50 visits
  5. adult fanfiction – 49 visits
  6. cassandra claire – 44 visits
  7. emo porn – 43 visits
  8. fan history – 35 visits
  9. cassandra clare – 34 visits
  10. gosselins without pity – 33 visits

Coming in at the 40th most popular keyword search with 17 visits was russet noon.

First there was Torchsong Chicago. Now there is TwiCon…

June 11th, 2009

What is it with conventions and problems with their guests of honor lately?  Guests haven’t not been able to attend.  Expectations for attendance by the masses regarding the guests of honor have been off the mark.  High prices for tickets lead to expectations that concoms don’t seem to be able to meet or convey effectively to avoid disappointment.

Two conventions have dealt with this recently.  First there was Torchsong Chicago. Then there was TwiCon. Below are extracts from both articles on Fan History to convey the problems both conventions are suffering:

Torchsong Chicago:

There was also mixed reaction from the risque antics which John Barrowman apparently got up to during his satellite-link appearances in both the Q&A session and the Cabaret.[21],[22],[23] There were later requests from John not to post/share some of the more raunchy aspects of what went down publicly, for fear of negative backlash from the British press, and again, some fans reacted negatively, feeling they were being manipulated.[24],[25] It was also pointed out that the video feed was copyrighted and the con management did not want photos of the feed posted due to copyright concerns.[26] Accusations of jealousy were made over some of these issues of requested silence and non-posting of photos.[27]

TwiCon:

In 2009, the cost of membership was listed as $255/person.[1] On June 9, 2009, it was announced that only one “free” autograph would be included with the membership, and attendees had to reserve their free autograph of choice in advance (beginning June 19). There would be a limit of 2 autographs and one photo-op per attendee, and each guest would only do 65 photo-ops. Many fans were upset by this announcement, feeling they had been mislead on how the autographs and photos would be handled and given the cost of membership to the convention.[2]

What is going on with conventions these days?  Have people become used to the idea of megaconventions like DragonCon and ComiCon in San Diego?  Do high costs of running these events drive up the expectations to the point where they are not managable?  Did the connectivity of the Internet just make the drama involving conventions easier to access?

Whatever the reasons, this sort of convention drama is not going to go away any time soon.  If you’re attending a convention, look at issues that attendees at other conventions have dealt with.  Be prepared and have some sort of plan in case of a worst case scenario.   Know your rights and understand refund policies before you purchase a ticket so that you don’t get any surprises like the people attended Torchsong Chicago and those who will attend TwiCon.

J&N: A Love Story by Rachel Plotkin

June 9th, 2009

J&N: A Love Story by Rachel Plotkin is a Twilight story that the author self published and listed on Amazon.com. This would be notable in and of itself but this is the second time in less than two month that the Twilight fandom has wanked this issue hard. Unlike the situation with Russet Noon, this one looks like it will end a lot faster. Less than 24 hours after the story made fandom wank (and was removed when f_w learned a minor was involved), the story was gone from Amazon.com.

Why is this happening again and again? Technology has made publishing material like this so much easier. There are fewer barriers to entry. Fandom has fewer gatekeepers and mentors that can help socialize and help new fen learn social norms. We’re going to see a lot more of this in the coming years because of those issues.

Popular fandoms?

June 2nd, 2009

We had a couple of searches to our blog asking about popular fandoms.  That’s kind of subjective and hard to measure but I’ll try to list them again. :)

Year to date, the most popular fandoms on Fan History based on how many times the article about them have been accessed are:

  1. Digimon
  2. Nartuo
  3. Twilight
  4. Gundam Wing
  5. Harry Potter
  6. Supernatural
  7. The Fast and the Furious
  8. Dragon Ball Z
  9. Prince of Tennis
  10. Sailor Moon

That list doesn’t necessarily seem accurate.  It probably reflects where Fan History’s articles are better.

A second way that you could measure the most popular fandoms is based on the total of new stories posted to FanFiction.Net.  For yesterday?  The following list was generated:

1 Twilight 204 1
2 Naruto 164 3
3 Harry Potter 158 2
4 Bleach 39 10
5 Supernatural 38 6
6 D.Gray-Man 32 34
7 Yu-Gi-Oh 20 243
8 Maximum Ride 20 43
9 Death Note 19 7
10 Pokemon 18 11

That seems a bit more accurate for popular fandoms and wow! Yay!   It seems to agree some with the most popular list of fandoms on Fan History.  Of course, the list of fandoms that appear there have not been updated since September 2008. :/

Then there is another way to guess at most popular fandoms.  That’s based on activity levels on LiveJournal.  This list isn’t all comprehensive and because of bot problems?  The list hasn’t been updated since March 31, 2009… but here it is!

Rank   ? Fandom   ? Total Activity   ? Previous rank   ?
1 Twilight 14372 1
2 Meta 7649 2
3 America’s Next Top Model 2672 6
4 Pokemon 2470 5
5 House M.D. 2114 4
6 Gossip Girls 1628 12
7 Doctor Who 1624 10
8 WWE 1581 9
9 Merlin 1496 14
10 Lost 1405 19
11 Harry Potter 1346 8
12 Bones 1328 7
13 High School Musical 1220 3
14 Katekyo Hitman Reborn! 1038 13
15 iCarly 1033 16
16 Bleach 1020 11
17 Sailor Moon 995 15
18 Jonas Brothers 966 25
19 Naruto 944 18
20 NCIS 716 23
21 As the World Turns 709 64
22 the GazettE 685 20
23 Gackt 662 17
24 Ben 10 645 97
25 Mystery Science Theater 3000 607 29
26 Slayers 568 21
27 An Cafe 554 45
28 Life on Mars 548 32
29 The Office (US) 528 35
30 Transformers 519 22
31 Sports fan fiction 518 40
32 Soccer fan fiction 515 41
33 D.Gray-Man 508 52
34 30 Rock 480 42
35 Heroes 392 37
36 How I Met Your Mother 387 46
37 My Chemical Romance 386 131
38 David Tennant 382 30
39 Batman 378 128
40 Torchwood 353 28
41 Batman Beyond 352 159
42 One Piece 342 60
43 Man from U.N.C.L.E. 339 85
44 One Tree Hill 336 34
45 Fullmetal Alchemist 322 47
46 Ewan McGregor 320 36
47 Star Trek 319 51
48 Meta community 317 24
49 Lord of the Rings 306 49
50 Dancing with the Stars 306 48
51 Yu-Gi-Oh 301 31
52 Stargate SG-1 296 54
53 30 Seconds to Mars 296 50
54 Brand New 291 80
55 Saiyuki 268 43
56 U2 266 63
57 Princess Tutu 260 61
58 American Girls 259 78
59 Dollhouse 255 39
60 X-Files 254 160
61 Top Gear 252 87
62 Geoffrey Rush 233 103
63 The Mentalist 230 57
64 American Idol 217 73
65 Pushing Daises 215 79
66 Queer as Folk 211 74
67 Death Note 203 120
68 Britney Spears 197 72
69 Supernatural 189 55
70 Criminal Minds 185 62
71 Ugly Betty 182 65
72 Laurell K. Hamilton 175 171
73 Law and Order: SVU 172 69
74 Anita Blake 172 192
75 The Late Late Show 168 58
76 Craig Ferguson 168 59
77 L Word 164 75
78 The Sentinel 161 68
79 General Hospital 155 70
80 Manic 151 201
81 D’espairs Ray 150 44
82 CSI: Miami 147 94
83 Discworld 145 95
84 Prince of Tennis 143 1020
85 Neil Patrick Harris 138 108
86 Christina Aguilera 131 426
87 Serenity 122 82
88 Manchester United 122 38
89 Law and Order 121 119
90 Blake’s 7 121 166
91 The Young and the Restless 120 141
92 Ace Attorney 120 173
93 Vancouver Islanders 119 105
94 Shugo Chara! 119 89
95 Beatles 117 127
96 Zelda 115 111
97 Firefly 115 83
98 Bullet for my Valentine 115 149
99 Hanson 113 67
100 Days of Our Lives 113 96

Maybe you want that information based on another language?   How about Russian?  Then these fandoms are some of the most popular (at least in March 2009):

Rank   ? Fandom   ? Total Activity   ? Previous rank   ?
1 Harry Potter 795 3
2 Watchmen 417 1
3 Radiohead 140 2
4 House M.D. 112 6
5 Firefly 75 14
6 South Park 71 4
7 Buffy: The Vampire Slayer 57 89
8 Hugh Laurie 56 26
9 Star Trek 43 38
10 Babylon 5 42 13
11 Simpsons 38 11
12 Battlestar Galactica 37 36
13 Futurama 34 9
14 Star Wars 27 5
15 Supernatural 20 21
16 PFC CSKA Moscow 20 8
17 Metallica 17 12
18 Blur 17 42
19 Terry Pratchett 13 10
20 The Cure 12 53

There are probably other ways to measure other popular fandoms but those are the ones that we have to measure popularity.

Russet Noon update

June 2nd, 2009

The Russet Noon saga mostly was done two to three weeks ago. We’ve seen increased interest in the past two days. If people are looking for an update? There is one.

Check out this edit and this one. More info.

If you’re still following the saga, we’d really love for some one to come in and update the article more. Thanks! :)

Top articles on Fan History for May 2009

June 1st, 2009

Another month ends and it is time for another list of some of the most popular, most viewed articles for May 2009. There have been some notable shifts in what is on here from last month.

Articles

  1. Draco/Hermione
  2. Russet Noon
  3. Race Fail 2009
  4. Cassandra Claire
  5. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction_Archive
  6. Twilight
  7. AdultFanFiction.Net
  8. Digimon
  9. FanFiction.Net
  10. Naruto

Fandoms

  1. Cassandra Claire
  2. Twilight
  3. Digimon
  4. Naruto
  5. Supernatural
  6. Star Trek
  7. Jon and Kate Plus 8
  8. Gundam Wing
  9. Harry Potter
  10. Sailor Moon

Ships

  1. Draco/Hermione
  2. Sesshoumaru/Kagome
  3. Snape/Hermione
  4. Kirk/Spock
  5. Michael/Maria
  6. Harry/Draco
  7. Harry/Hermione
  8. Max/Liz
  9. Takari
  10. Draco/Ginny

Kerfluffles

  1. Russet Noon
  2. Race Fail 2009
  3. Cassandra Claire
  4. Dreamwidth Studios
  5. Race wank
  6. LiveJournal
  7. GreatestJournal
  8. Cassandra Claire’s Plagiarism
  9. Fandom Wank

Fans

  1. Cassandra Claire
  2. LadySybilla
  3. Maya
  4. Caito
  5. Msscribe
  6. Bhaalspawn
  7. Heidi8
  8. Ithilien22
  9. Dot-chan
  10. Minisinoo

Fan Fiction Archives and Blogging Services

  1. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction_Archive
  2. AdultFanFiction.Net
  3. FanFiction.Net
  4. Dreamwidth Studios
  5. LiveJournal
  6. GreatestJournal
  7. FanWorks.Org
  8. RestrictedSection
  9. FanLib
  10. FanDomination.Net

From the keyword vault… 2

May 7th, 2009

I really loved doing the last post. We got a few more visits with interesting keywords to our blog.  (The wiki is much better optimized.  We get few hits based on these sort of keywords.)

what to do after wank

When I first read these, I thought that these were related to wank, the fannish term.  I had a mental block and didn’t realize that people were visiting the blog looking for masturbation advice.

Given that, on with the question! If we are talking actual masturbation, when you’re done, you clean yourself up.  Then, if you like Fan History, you visit pages like fandom_wank and slash.  If you’re talking about wanking of the fandom sort, when you’re done, you take a fandom break for a couple of days.  wanking is frequently high stress.  When you’re done, you need time to think, to cool down to re-evaluate, to assess what steps you need to take after that to protect yourself in fandom.

neil patrick harris icons livejournal

We’ve got information about a couple of Neil Patrick Harris LiveJournal communities.  We don’t have any icons on the wiki.  You could probably upload a few if you wanted to illustrate information relevant articles.  You’re probably better off searching on LiveJournal for that, rather than using Google.

dreamwidth greatestjournal

Dreamwidth Studios and GreatestJournal have nothing to do with each other, other than both having core fandom audiences, being run by one or two volunteers, being run with the intention of living off the money earned from the sites and using modified versions of LiveJournal’s open source code.    The people who run it are not the same.  They have different cultures.  GreatestJournal was populated early by role players.  Dreamwidth Studios was populated by metafans.

wanking race

Seriously?  Do people actually have races where two or three people get together to see who can get it off first?  I don’t have advice for that.  I haven’t seen any sort of race to wank to make fandom_wank or metafandom.  If people know of any bets to see who could make one or the other in a wankfest, let me know as it would be enlightening and educational.

livejournal stats

If you’re looking for LiveJournal statistics, check out LiveJournal community size.  Sadly, these numbers haven’t been updated in a while because of a problem with our bot but there are three month months worth of data that still make it useful and interesting.

There are a couple more that I really would like to do.  They require a bit more extensive answers like “why twilight is so big?” and “how do you communicate if service users are upset” so I’m putting that off for a bit.

April 2009: Most popular fandoms

May 1st, 2009

April has ended and I’m feeling in the mood to blog. So in celebration of April ending and rain letting up and May flowers coming, a list of the most popular fandom articles (based the number of article views) on Fan History for the month of March and a break down of the most popular articles on Fan History for year to date.
April 2009: Most popular fandoms

  1. Cassandra Claire
  2. The Fast and the Furious – Movie interest
  3. Digimon
  4. Naruto
  5. Harry Potter
  6. Roswell
  7. Gundam Wing
  8. Twilight
  9. Supernatural
  10. Prince of Tennis

April 2009: Most popular articles

  1. Draco/Hermione
  2. Russet Noon – Referenced on Fandom Wank and elsewhere
  3. Cassandra Claire – Page views down from last month
  4. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive
  5. The Fast and the Furious
  6. User talk:Artistic Revolution – Related to being mentioned on fandom wank.
  7. AdultFanFiction.Net
  8. Caito – Person who posted the wank report on fandom wank
  9. FanFiction.Net
  10. Digimon

January to April 2009: Most popular fandoms

  1. Cassandra Claire
  2. Naruto
  3. Digimon
  4. Twilight
  5. Gundam Wing
  6. The Fast and the Furious
  7. Harry Potter
  8. Dragon Ball Z
  9. Supernatural
  10. Pride and Prejudice

Can LadySybilla and Russet Noon hang on long enough to change fandom?

April 20th, 2009

I’ve been following the Russet Noon situation with a lot of interest; it’s like the Star Wars book situation meets RDR that’s been crossed with a Harry Potter Lexicon with a bit of CounsinJean mixed in.

I’m really curious how this will turn out. The author of Russet Noon, LadySybilla, has done herself no favors in some regards by using Wikipedia for self promotion, engaging in alleged socketpuppeting and alleged  trying to sell the books behind the scenes to bloggers. This falls pretty much into the realms of what happened to CousinJean and the Star Wars writer. Their actions might have fallen into a legal “gray zone”, but fandom pressure came to bear and both were punished so much by fandom that they largely left the fandom field of battle before they could get sued.

So far in this case, it doesn’t look like LadySybilla has been threatened with legal action. Why? I’m not certain. She might have been and we might not have heard about it. Or the intellectual property owners could be hoping that fandom makes the situation go away, like they did with the CousinJean and the Star Wars book. Or, the intellectual property holders could be scared of LadySybilla having lawyers, like Steve Van der Ark and RDR had at the Harry Potter Lexicon. The last one is the big worry potentially because if LadySybilla has lawyers and is willing to go to court, she could win and then things could become really difficult for the entertainment industry.

If LadySybilla isn’t pushed to take her book off the market by fandom and if she isn’t sue, she could open fandom’s pandora box. The conventional wisdom is that the Twilight fandom is feral where people aren’t grounded in media fandom’s historical traditions. If they see that some one can get away with this, they might be willing to try to do similar. The flood gates might swing wide open with this and fandom could very well change in unexpected ways.

So I’m taking the wait and see approach because this is all fascinating to watch play out and think of what might be if LadySybilla can deal with fandom pressure long enough to get her story published.

Follow up: Most human revised articles on Fan History

April 9th, 2009

The last post was heavy in terms of bot revised edits on Fan History. It is that way because our data collection bots update every day and some have been active since September 2008. This is the last of non-bot, human edited entries on Fan History.

The following data is cached, and was last updated 18:45, 9 April 2009.

Showing below up to 500 results starting with #1.

View (previous 500) (next 500) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)

  1. Harry Potter ?(291 revisions)
  2. Draco/Hermione ?(242 revisions)
  3. Bandfic ?(228 revisions)
  4. Beauty and the Beast ?(221 revisions)
  5. Digimon ?(219 revisions)
  6. Supernatural ?(219 revisions)
  7. CSI ?(214 revisions)
  8. Rescue Rangers ?(209 revisions)
  9. Doctor Who ?(200 revisions)
  10. X-Files ?(195 revisions)
  11. Main Page ?(190 revisions)
  12. Cassandra Claire ?(186 revisions)
  13. Organization for Transformative Works ?(184 revisions)
  14. Slash ?(157 revisions)
  15. Doctor Who fanzines ?(138 revisions)
  16. Star Trek ?(135 revisions)
  17. Bleach ?(132 revisions)
  18. Russell Crowe ?(122 revisions)
  19. Star Trek fanzines ?(121 revisions)
  20. AdultFanFiction.Net ?(119 revisions)
  21. Star Wars ?(118 revisions)
  22. Sailor Moon ?(118 revisions)
  23. The Police ?(115 revisions)
  24. Susan M. Garrett ?(114 revisions)
  25. Daiken ?(114 revisions)
  26. Lord of the Rings ?(113 revisions)
  27. LiveJournal ?(112 revisions)
  28. Mortal Instruments ?(107 revisions)
  29. Roswell ?(106 revisions)
  30. FanFiction.Net ?(106 revisions)
  31. Zelda ?(105 revisions)
  32. Duran Duran ?(103 revisions)
  33. The Forever Knight Fan Fiction Awards ?(101 revisions)
  34. Naruto ?(100 revisions)
  35. Msscribe ?(99 revisions)
  36. Avatar: The Last Airbender ?(97 revisions)
  37. Mlina ?(95 revisions)
  38. Lucia de’Medici ?(95 revisions)
  39. Warcraft ?(95 revisions)
  40. Draco/Ginny ?(95 revisions)
  41. Final Fantasy VII ?(94 revisions)
  42. Current events ?(91 revisions)
  43. Grissom/Sara ?(89 revisions)
  44. Canadian Idol ?(89 revisions)
  45. Fan fiction archives ?(89 revisions)
  46. Gundam Wing ?(87 revisions)
  47. Plagiarism ?(86 revisions)
  48. Race Fail 2009 ?(86 revisions)
  49. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer ?(86 revisions)
  50. Xena: Warrior Princess ?(85 revisions)
  51. Twilight ?(85 revisions)
  52. My Chemical Romance ?(83 revisions)
  53. X-men ?(82 revisions)
  54. Thunderbirds ?(79 revisions)
  55. Hey Arnold! ?(78 revisions)
  56. Tikatu ?(78 revisions)

Most revised articles on Fan History

April 9th, 2009

We discovered today that Special:MostRevisions won’t load 95% of the time because it just takes too long to load. That’s what happens with over a million and a half edits. Before we cache it and it no longer updates, I thought I would present to you that list of the top 50 most edited articles. A lot of these are bot updated daily so counting them seems a bit iffy… but that’s neither here nor there. now for the list:

Pages with the most revisions

From Fan History Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Showing below up to 50 results starting with #1.

  1. Harry Potter ?(291 revisions)
  2. Draco/Hermione ?(242 revisions)
  3. Zoey101 (LiveJournal) size/table ?(229 revisions)
  4. Bandfic ?(228 revisions)
  5. Beauty and the Beast ?(221 revisions)
  6. Supernatural ?(219 revisions)
  7. Digimon ?(219 revisions)
  8. CSI ?(214 revisions)
  9. Rescue Rangers ?(209 revisions)
  10. Harry Potter fan fiction community size/table ?(205 revisions)
  11. NCIS fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  12. Naruto fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  13. Avatar: Last Airbender fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  14. Bleach fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  15. Twilight fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  16. Death Note fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  17. House MD fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  18. Inuyasha fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  19. Supernatural fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  20. Fandom tracking/table ?(202 revisions)
  21. Bones fan fiction community size/table ?(202 revisions)
  22. CSI fan fiction community size/table ?(202 revisions)
  23. Doctor Who fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  24. D.Gray-Man fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  25. Wrestling fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  26. Pokemon fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  27. Heroes fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  28. Maximum Ride fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  29. CSI: New York fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  30. Prince of Tennis fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  31. Shugo Chara! fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  32. Doctor Who ?(200 revisions)
  33. Stargate: SG-1 fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  34. Total Drama Island fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  35. Vampire Knights fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  36. One Piece fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  37. Chronicles of Narnia fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  38. Bis(s) fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  39. Hannah Montana fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  40. Katekyo Hitman Reborn! fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  41. South Park fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  42. Stargate: Atlantis fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  43. Code Geass fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  44. Criminal Minds fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  45. Yu-Gi-Oh fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  46. One Tree Hill fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  47. Ouran High School Host Club fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  48. Sailor Moon fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  49. Fullmetal Alchemist fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  50. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)

March 2009: Most popular fandoms

April 1st, 2009

March has ended and I’m feeling in the mood to blog. So in celebration of March ending and spring coming, a list of the most popular fandom articles on Fan History for the month of March and a break down of the most popular articles on Fan History for the first quarter of the year.

March 2009: Most popular fandoms

  1. Cassandra Claire – her new book came out this month
  2. Naruto – lots of traffic from search
  3. Digimon
  4. Twilight – fandom is really popular
  5. Harry Potter – Fan History has lots of content
  6. Dragon Ball Z – lots of traffic from search, lots of content
  7. Mortal Instruments – last book in trilogy came out
  8. Gundam Wing
  9. Supernatural – fandom has been wanking a lot
  10. Bleach – lots of traffic from search

January to March 2009: Most popular fandoms

  1. Cassandra Claire
  2. Naruto
  3. Digimon
  4. Twilight
  5. Gundam Wing
  6. Harry Potter
  7. Mortal Instruments
  8. Dragon Ball z
  9. Supernatural
  10. Pride and Prejudice

January to March 2009: Most popular ships

  1. Draco/Hermione
  2. Snape/Hermione
  3. Michael/Maria
  4. Taito
  5. Draco/Ginny
  6. Takari
  7. Harry/Draco
  8. Sesshoumaru/Kagome
  9. Max/Liz
  10. Harry/Ginny

January to March 2009: Most popular fans

  1. Msscribe
  2. Cori Falls
  3. Ithilien22
  4. Laura
  5. Heidi8
  6. Minisinoo
  7. Black-Beri
  8. FictionLyn
  9. Capnnerefir
  10. Maygra

January to March 2009: Most popular fansites/fan fiction archives

  1. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive
  2. FanFiction.Net
  3. AdultFanFiction.Net
  4. GreatestJournal
  5. LiveJournal
  6. FanWorks.Org
  7. Galbadia Hotel
  8. FanDominaton.Net
  9. FanLib
  10. InsaneJournal

Fan fiction, social media & chasing the numbers with quality content (Hint: Doesn’t matter)

February 2nd, 2009

Writing quality content...Fan fiction in this case isn’t about numbers, or so many people suggest. Social media is. But social media shouldn’t be about numbers. Social media should be about having quality conversations where there is some return that you can measure from that, so numbers shouldn’t matter that much. And the fan fiction community might say it isn’t about numbers but lots of people obsess about the number of readers they have and how they can improve those numbers…

… and the quest in both social media and the fan fiction community is often characterized by that chase for numbers. The goal is to increase your metrics. More readers. More followers. For fan fiction, that’s measured in hits to your stories. In social media, that is sometimes measured in the number of followers on Twitter. In both cases, the conventional wisdom is that if you provide high value content, quality content, people will discover your work and read more of it. You’ll eventually get more followers on Twitter, become a Big Name Fan or even possibly leverage a book deal drawing on your fan base from your high quality fan fiction. CONTENT! CONTENT! CONTENT! This post on problogger Darren Rowse is just one of literally dozens that suggests that in social media. And in fan fiction communities, just go to almost any community and you’ll see people try to reaffirm that idea. Quality content is king! If you have high value, quality content, people will gravitate towards you! Content! Content! Content is king!

Except it is not. If you’re chasing numbers, quality matters very little. What actually matters is figuring out how to game the system in a way that is not black hat and that gets results. This is true both with fan fiction and with social media.

If you want readers for your fan fiction, don’t write Savage Garden hetfic or Wheel of Fortune Pat/Vanna White fan fiction. There isn’t an audience there. (If you do it right, there might be an audience for it that could be leveraged if you can get it to go viral. But there probably is not a large established audience for that.) You write something more popular like say… Twilight, Naruto, High School Musical. You then write popular ships. You feedback popular writers to get great name recognition and feedback lesser known authors to get niche attention. You create a LiveJournal account, a twitter account and possibly a mailing list dedicated to your work. You follow all the cool kids, join the biggest communities and post your stories there. You interact with your readers, participate heavily in meta-discussions, and generally become known for your activity as much if not more so than your fiction. All of that makes your content pretty secondary to what you’re doing story quality-wise. You find other ways to game the system to get readers. You write long serialized stories, which tend to draw more readers and help maintain an audience over an extended period of time. You make sure the story features popular pairings. You link to it in your sig everywhere. You submit it to sites like Fan History and FanworksFinder. You submit your personal fansite to sites like DMOZ, IMDB and FanPop. You find out what days to post to get more traffic. The content is secondary to what you do in order to get readers.

Social media is pretty much the same way, only with Twitter? It pretty takes much less work than fan fiction in order to get your numbers up. You want to get a lot of followers to the tune of 2,000+ so people will take you seriously as some one who knows what they are doing in social media? First, you find some one who is following a lot of people in a short period of time and then follow everyone who follows them. (Ideal ratio? They are following 4+ for every 1 following them.) Go to Twitterholic and following anyone with 1,000+ followers/following where there is an imbalance with more people the person is following them than people following them because those people are likely trying to inflate their follow count too and are likely to follow back. As you’re doing this, people will start to follow you who are meet those criteria. Follow them and followers who look like auto follows. Make sure you have some content on your account that isn’t obvious spam and update regularly so you don’t totally set off alarm bells. Try for some minimal interaction. You can easily get 2,000 followers a month after starting that. In ramping up those numbers, quality content matters little because the system is built in with a huge number of people also trying to game the system to get followers. Yeah, you can try to produce quality content on Twitter but if your goal is numbers, it isn’t the best and fasted way to improve your metrics at all. Quality content is again secondary to working the system.

The ideal of quality content leading to followers and readers is a myth. Yes, it can’t hurt… but that would lead to the conclusion that those who have the best talent and produce the highest quality results always come out on top but a quick look at the music, movie, television, acting and book publishing industries would tend to disprove that. Plenty of sub-par product succeeds where quality languishes in obscurity, and promotion tactics (or lack thereof) can often be the reason why. I think a lot of people putting forth this myth assume their content is quality, or they are part of a system that doesn’t want to be honest with how people get ahead with some of these metrics that people value: Follow counts and number of times your story was read.

Fandoms and their musical tastes & trends

January 23rd, 2009

So, I have recently fallen in crazy love with Last.Fm. Not only is it a great service for discovering new music, but also tracking my own listening habits, and now, I see, for examining fandom trends and looking at what connections there may be between certain anime, media fandoms and bandoms. This is possible as Last.fm allows users to create “groups” of any kind, and statistics will show what are the weekly top artists for that group.

So what are some popular musical artists within certain large fandom groups right now?

Let’s first look at Twilight. There are currently over 1,200 members of the Last.Fm Twilight group, and their Top 10 artists currently are:

1. Paramore
2. Muse
3. Linkin Park
4. Carter Burwell
5. Katy Perry
6. Coldplay
7. Britney Spears
8. The Black Ghosts
9. Iron & Wine
10. Blue Foundation

Not surprisingly, 7 of those 10 artists have material on the Twilight soundtrack cd, explaining their popularity.

Looking next at Harry Potter, which has a Last.Fm group of over 1,500 members and a fanbase with some similarities in age and makeup to Twilight, we discover some close similarities in musical taste:

1. Coldplay
2. Muse
3. Paramore
4. The Killers
5. The Beatles
6. Britney Spears
7. Linkin Park
8. Katy Perry
9. Radiohead
10. Fall Out Boy

6 of the Harry Potter Top 10 are the same as for Twilight, including artists such as Britney Spears and Katy Perry, not on the Twilight soundtrack but popular performers within the teenage/20-something age group. How exactly The Beatles and Radiohead fit in I’m not sure, unless they reflect some of the wider age-range and fannish make-up of Harry Potter fandom? I’ll be curious to keep comparing the data on these two fan groups in future weeks.

Let’s also look at Naruto, a popular anime which also has a large (1,400+ members) Last.Fm group. Here’s their current Top 10:

1. Linkin Park
2. System of a Down
3. Metallica
4. Muse
5. Coldplay
6. Toshiro Masuda (Naruto soundtrack composer)
7. Red Hot Chili Peppers
8. The Killers
8. Rammstein
10. Nightwish

Again we see some familiar names, such as Linkin Park, Muse, Coldplay and The Killers, but there are also some more metal and hard rock acts such as Metallica, System of a Down and Rammstein. So is there a connection between Naruto and metal fandom? I’m curious to know! Has a lot of metal been used in Naruto songvids? Can anyone explain this more?

Finally, let’s look at the Top 10 artists this week for an older fandom: Star Trek. The Star Trek Last.Fm group is smaller than the others we’ve looked at so far–about 350 members, and the Top 10 artists are quite different from the other groups looked at so far:

1. The Beatles
2. Nine Inch Nails
3. U2
4. Pink Floyd
5. The Cure
6. Depeche Mode
7. Radiohead
8. Red Hot Chili Peppers
9. The Rolling Stones
10. David Bowie

The skew is certainly towards much older musical acts from the 60s & 70s (Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, David Bowie…), 80s & 90s (Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, U2, The Cure…) Musical tastes for the fandom match quite closely with the time periods when Star Trek itself was perhaps at its most popular. Though there are The Beatles and Radiohead again. Maybe they’re just popular all across fandom? Will the release of the upcoming Star Trek movie bring in a younger fanbase and skew the musical taste of the group more towards currently popular acts?

Anyway, such are the things I find interesting to look at on Last.Fm currently, and what it may or may not say about the connections between different fandom communities.

We have LiveJournal stats! So what fandoms are hot on LJ?

January 14th, 2009

I’ll get to the title line after first explaining what we’re talking about with LiveJournal stats. If you haven’t figured it out, we love stats at Fan History. We love them a lot. Stats can back up your gut feeling about what is going on in fandom. We’ve been tracking the size of fandom on FanFiction.Net, FanWorks.Org, FicWad, SkyHawke, FanFikion.De and Freedom of Speech for a couple of months and we’re addicted. It showed us that Twilight fandom had a small post movie release bump but it really took about two, three weeks for the fandom to explode. (And the numbers haven’t gone down since.)

Given this love, we wanted to get more stats. And we wanted our stats to come from LiveJournal and its clones because we’ve always been told that LiveJournal is a hub of fandom activity. How busy is the fandom? How active? What fandoms are more active than others? How do we measure the level of fandom activity on LiveJournal and its clones?

The method that was chose was to manually create a list of LJ comms based on fandoms. We chose manual because interests don’t really work. You could pick up icon communities dedicated to 100 fandoms where the fandom is unlikely to be represented regularly. We then built a list which we sorted by fandom, by language and by service. Our final list for LiveJournal included 3,092 fandoms. We couldn’t really make it much bigger because we needed to be able to update all these articles in a single day AND the bot would need to access each profile once a day to get the stats we were looking for. The stats pick up total posts, total comments, total members, total watchers and that information is put onto an article about the community in question. All the communities for a fandom are then added together and put on article which measures the total activity in a fandom based on our list for that fandom. Example: Harry Potter LiveJournal community size. After that’s done, those columns are then added together based on language for the community and we get a beautiful list like this list.

What’s interesting is that Twilight is hot on LiveJournal and it clones AND hot with various fan fiction archives. Harry Potter, second on fan fiction archives, is only 18th on LiveJournal. (This could be because our LiveJournal sample is missing the more active HP communities but I some how doubt it.) Naruto is third with fan fiction archives but 15th on LiveJournal. This could be because anime communities are much better represented elsewhere on sites like CrunchyRoll, AnimeNewsNetwork, anime specific blogging sites, etc.

When you get out of English, Twilight fandom is well, active but not always active. It was tops on our Finnish sample. It was 8th in our French sample. It was 7th in our Italian sample. It was tops in Spanish. For the other languages, we couldn’t find communities for Twilight to even be included. That’s the case for most fandoms: Non-English representation is tiny. The fandom language communities just aren’t there, even if the language is. (There are half a dozen Slovak communities but none are fandom specific.)

So that all out of the way, below are the top 100 fandoms on LiveJournal, based on our sample, for yesterday:

Fandom movers and shakers for LiveJournal on January 14, 2009
Rank   ? Fandom   ? Total Activity   ? Previous rank   ?
1 Twilight 6665 1
2 Meta 1232 2
3 WWE 1077 25
4 House M.D. 951 3
5 Katekyo Hitman Reborn! 833 7
6 Gossip Girls 735 9
7 Doctor Who 727 4
8 How I Met Your Mother 473 6
9 Merlin 381 5
10 Jonas Brothers 322 13
11 Bones 300 48
12 Top Gear 278 45
13 Darker than Black 221 31
14 As the World Turns 219 18
15 Naruto 184 16
16 30 Seconds to Mars 180 44
17 30 Rock 168 14
18 Harry Potter 167 10
19 Hanson 165 84
20 One Tree Hill 162 124
21 Slayers 150 47
22 My Chemical Romance 134 75
23 New Kids on the Block 130 156
24 David Tennant 130 19
25 NCIS 129 24
26 Laurell K. Hamilton 125 37
27 Britney Spears 124 34
28 Anita Blake 123 36
29 Life on Mars 118 26
30 High School Musical 118 12
31 Ugly Betty 115 33
32 Avatar: The Last Airbender 115 79
33 Neil Patrick Harris 113 8
34 Mystery Science Theater 3000 113 54
35 Bleach 112 15
36 Manchester United 111 11
37 Sports fan fiction 107 42
38 Soccer fan fiction 107 43
39 Sailor Moon 98 28
40 Transformers 94 40
41 The Office (US) 93 23
42 Grey’s Anatomy 87 50
43 Star Trek 83 21
44 Prince of Tennis 81 109
45 Torchwood 76 17
46 Stargate SG-1 76 29
47 An Cafe 76 20
48 Ben 10 74 108
49 Gackt 73 72
50 Pokemon 71 74
51 Alice Nine 67 128
52 Law and Order: SVU 65 71
53 America’s Next Top Model 62 22
54 Lost 57 68
55 24 56 112
56 West Wing 55 80
57 The Sentinel 52 46
58 Vancouver Islanders 51 52
59 The Big Bang Theory 51 117
60 The Mentalist 48 73
61 Saiyuki 48 39
62 Bob Dylan 48 253
63 Fullmetal Alchemist 47 69
64 Ewan McGregor 46 51
65 Ace Attorney 45 119
66 the GazettE 44 56
67 Veronica Mars 44 91
68 U2 44 162
69 The Young and the Restless 44 306
70 CSI: Miami 44 111
71 Atlanta Braves 44 228
72 One Piece 43 38
73 L Word 43 67
74 Dir en grey 43 30
75 Futurama 42 703
76 CSI 42 64
77 iCarly 40 27
78 Kingdom Hearts 40 107
79 Batman 40 78
80 Speed Racer 39 92
81 Beverly Hills 90210 39 127
82 X-Files 37 85
83 Drake & Josh 37 58
84 Phantom of the Opera 36 209
85 Mad Men 36 59
86 Lord of the Rings 36 101
87 Hellsing 34 187
88 Dancing with the Stars 34 131
89 Backstreet Boys 34 183
90 The Late Late Show 33 96
91 Craig Ferguson 33 99
92 Inuyasha 32 141
93 Boston Red Sox 29 104
94 Princess Tutu 27 65
95 David Bowie 27 110
96 Bandom 27 88
97 Sonic: The Hedgehog 25 208
98 Whose Line is it Anyway 24 95
99 Supernatural 24 60
100 Pushing Daises 24 32

What’s hot fandom wise for January 7, 2009 on Fan History

January 8th, 2009

Top fandom articles on Fan History for January 7. We’ll see how long I keep this up. :)

January 7

  1. Naruto
  2. Digimon
  3. Twilight
  4. Gundam Wing
  5. City of Bones/Mortal Instruments
  6. Dragon Ball Z
  7. Avatar: The Last Airbender
  8. Metallica
  9. Hey Arnold!
  10. Pride and Prejudice

Top fandoms for January 4, 5, 6 on Fan History

January 7th, 2009

This is just really interesting to see. The list of popular fandom articles on Fan History rarely seems to coordinate with top fan fiction fandoms, nor with what is on television. I would speculate that we won’t see that until we probably quadruple our traffic and have better links to Fan History from out visitors. :) At the moment, it probably very much relates to which fandom articles we plug.

January 4

  1. Twilight
  2. Naruto
  3. Digimon
  4. Blade
  5. ABBA
  6. X-Files
  7. Kim Possible
  8. Sailor Moon
  9. Supernatural
  10. City of Bones/Mortal Instruments

January 5

  1. Demon Ororon
  2. Twilight
  3. Gundam Wing
  4. Naruto
  5. Digimon
  6. Harry Potter
  7. Savage Garden
  8. D.Gray-Man
  9. Supernatural
  10. Bleach

January 6

  1. Twilight
  2. Harry Potter
  3. Naruto
  4. Anna Semenovich
  5. Alf
  6. City of Bones/Mortal Instruments
  7. Digimon
  8. Dragon Ball Z
  9. Gundam Wing
  10. Allison Stokke

Twilight fandom… so big! so active!

January 6th, 2009

I love data which helps paint a picture of fandom: How big is it? How active are the communities in it? So I was interested when I finally got some data from LiveJournal regarding the size of fandom on LiveJournal. We know it isn’t totally comprehensive but we have a list of 59 LiveJournal communities dedicated to the Twilight fandom.

Kicking off this year, between January 2 and January 4, these communities had 246 new posts. They had 7,425 additional comments. 278 new members joined these communities and 175 started watching them. That seems really, really high.   The average post is getting 30 comments.  That’s pretty big all things considered.  (Naruto for the sake of comparison is averaging around 6.9. D’espairs Ray is averaging 15.35 comments a post.) The communities are getting a whole lot of new members and are generating a whole lot of conversations, especially when compared to some other services like FanPop, FanFiction.Net and InsaneJournal. The size of Twilight fandom, at its current stage is thus just mind blowing. If there is any doubt that this is the new big fandom, all you need to do is compare it to Harry Potter, where the community list is has 73 total communities that it monitors.

I can’t wait to get more data to see what is going on in the Twilight fandom!

The following is a list of LiveJournal communities in our sample of 59 communities:

http://community.livejournal.com/crepusculito/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/crepusculoes/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/early_evening/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/edward_dazzles/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/edwardrosalie/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/emmett_rosalie/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/esmecarlisle/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/forks_high/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/forks_posse/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/jasperalice/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/just_cullen/

http://community.livejournal.com/lasirius/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/jacobleah/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/ily_taycob/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/latuacantate/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/lion_lamb/

http://community.livejournal.com/lionwolf/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/loveattwilight/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/modattack/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/musasenelclaro/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/read_twilight/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/sortofbeautiful/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/staytwilight/

http://community.livejournal.com/tm_switzerland/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twiconawards/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilicons/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_addict/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_adult/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_book/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_fics/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_film/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_italy/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_macros/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_santa/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_series/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_stamp/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_videos/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_t00bs/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight100/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilightcien/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilighters_it/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilightfan/

http://community.livejournal.com/twilightlims/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilightmanips/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilightxchange/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twi_ficrequest/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilightersanon/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/packnumbertwo/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/ecullendotorg/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/operationplaid/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/her_muse/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/newtonoutfitter/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twilight_fin/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twifin_mods/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/twstoryseek/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/vampires_et_cie/profile

http://community.livejournal.com/hpvamp/

http://community.livejournal.com/pattinson_daily/

http://community.livejournal.com/pattinsonlims/

49 of these communities are English language based. 2 are Finnish. 1 is French. 2 are Italian. 5 are Spanish. If you know of any communities not on this list which you think should be included, please let me know.

Most popular fandoms on Fan History for January 3!

January 4th, 2009

I kind of had a lot of fun with the top fandom lists for January 1 and 2 so here is the list of the most popular fandoms for January 3 on Fan History!

January 3

  1. Digimon
  2. Naruto
  3. Pride and Prejudice
  4. Twilight
  5. ABBA
  6. Supernatural
  7. City of Bones/Mortal Instruments
  8. Dragon Ball Z
  9. Prince of Tennis
  10. Lord of the Rings

Keyword peaks for fandoms and fansites on Fan History in 2008

December 31st, 2008

The following are when interest, based on keyword (not keyphrase), spiked in 2008 on Fan History according to Google Analytics…

January 5

January 11

January 13

January 14

January 27

February 22

February 27

March 2

March 8

March 13

March 18

April 17

April 29

May 22

May 27

June 10

June 13

July 6

July 20

July 24

July 29

August 3

August 11

August 12

August 13

August 21

August 22

August 23

September 12

September 27

September 29

October 6

October 15

October 16

October 17

October 20

October 21

October 31

November 6

November 9

November 9

November 11

November 22

November 23

November 28

December 1

December 6

December 9

December 11

December 28

December 29

Twilight, Harry Potter and Twitter! Oh my! (Also venns! I love the venns!)

December 19th, 2008

I love venn diagrams. (And data. And numbers. And other ways I can better visualize fandom.) I also love Twitter so I was ecstatic to discover TwitterVen which helps visualize what is going on Twitter using venn diagrams. I cranked it up and made the following chart with the keywords of Harry Potter, Twilight and fanfic.

Twitter venn diagram showing Twilight Harry Potter and fanfic

Lo! Behold! Wow! Twilight sure gets a lot of mentions on Twitter. Not surprising. I’ve read a number of people on LJ fandom talk about how Twilight will one day be bigger than Harry Potter. I’ve seen enough of data to know that Twilight fandom NOW is bigger than Harry Potter fandom NOW. What seems really surprising here is that there aren’t more mentions for both terms AND fanfic. Twilight and Harry Potter are mentioned more frequently together than those either with fanfic.

We have a couple more TwitterVens. If you create your own (upload it!), let us know if you find anything interesting!

Most popular Fan History wiki articles by month in 2008!

December 17th, 2008

In addition to top ten articles regarding content, a number of blogs and sites have been doing a month by month listing of their top posts and articles. As we’re all about riding the trends, though this obviously isn’t a trend in fandom (just in social media as far we can tell), we’re jumping on too! Sadly, we’re not as interesting as other sites and blogs. This is a bit of a snooze fest. (But continue reading anyway! Please?)

January 2008
Cassandra Claire: This was our most popular article in January. The second most popular article had half as many views. The wiki was pretty much known for this article at this point and trying to downplay it wouldn’t be successful for us until her popularity decreased and interest in the whole of the wiki increased. That would take a couple of months though.

February 2008
Cassandra Claire: Still the most popular article but the page views on the second most popular article, Draco/Hermione, that month were up and the gap between the two was smaller.

March 2008
Draco/Hermione: The article went from 1,400 page views in February to 4,800 in March. We got plugged by a really awesome Draco/Hermione fansite, did a few plugs of our own on various LiveJournal communities and elsewhere. This helped blow away the Cassandra Claire which had almost an additional thousand page views from February 2008.

April 2008
Cassandra Claire: Back to being the top article in April. At this point, we were busy working on this more practively and with a better staff than we had in months.

May 2008
Draco/Hermione: Back on top baby. This article was our most popular for May 2008. Our search engine on the site also saw increase action, with more searches being done than ever before.

June 2008
Cassandra Claire: Down from previous highs for views per month, it still came in as the most popular article.

July 2008
Draco/Hermione: And that popular Harry Potter pairing was back on top. I promise, if this list is yoru first exposure to Fan History, we aren’t just into Harry Potter. The wiki is more diverse than that. (Our SEO just became optimized around those two phrases… It wasn’t our fault. Really!)

August 2008
Draco/Hermione: Er. Yeah. Them again in August 2008. But great news! For the first time, our second place article was something not Cassandra Claire. The second most popular article was Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive which had 1,675 article views that month. Awesomeness.

September 2008
Draco/Hermione: Yeah. September 2008 is pretty much the same as August 2008 with fewer views on our two most popular articles.

October 2008
Draco/Hermione: Third verse, same as the first. We need more diversity and interest in our articles that are the top for the month. Help us out by improving some articles and plugging them because this write up has become boring with its predictability. on the upside, by tis month, Fan History has accomplished its goal of being less known for being about Cassandra Claire. (Now we’re known for other things. Some of them untrue. We’d rather not have changed what we are now known for if we could do things over.)

November 2008
Draco/Hermione: Did you even have to guess? Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive came in second with very little change in the amount of times the articles were viewed per month.

December 2008
Draco/Hermione: So far this month, that continues to be our most popular article. On a bright side, Twilight is our second most viewed article this month. It is nice to have a change their. Plug the article. Turn December around. Help keep the Twilight article at number two.

Twilight parody

December 15th, 2008
Take180.com view

I’ve watch that video and another one by them. REALLY, REALLY FUNNY. It fits with the movie and satirizes it wonderfully. (And I pathetically still want to see the actually movie again. I’m waiting for it to come out on DVD because seeing it once was one more than I should have.) Twilight, you’re still my public awful guilty secret.

FanFiction.Net vs. LiveJournal community size

December 6th, 2008

The bot isn’t finished running yet… but while still compiling, I thought it was worth looking at some of these fandoms and how the size of LJ fandom is beginning to look, how big fandoms look versus eachother and versus FanFiction.Net community size…

This isn’t yet complete as the bot continues to run. Some fandoms may not have had their communities looked at because they didn’t cross over much with communities the bot has already looked at. There might be some naming issues which still need to be resolved. (Which were corrected when I spotted a few of them.) Some fandoms just didn’t have communities about them in the sample community list. Some categories actually contracted as we did admin work such as deleting duplicate articles and handled Article Deletion Requests… so any fandom which didn’t have over 50 new articles for categories with over 650 articles in them were excluded.

But overall, this table begins to paint an interesting picture as to the biggest fandoms on LiveJournal. FanFiction.Net column is total articles from FanFiction.Net. LiveJournal column is FanFiction.Net + LiveJournal articles (or new total of articles in the category). Difference column equals total number of members from LiveJournal.

Fandom sized samples… how big?

December 6th, 2008

I’ve been bouncing off the walls for a bit now as we’re supposed to be getting a new bot for Fan History that is similar to Fan Fiction Stat Bot.  (It won’t probably be ready for another three weeks to a month.  I’m not in that much of a hurry and I’d rather the developer do it right.) The major difference is that this one will look at LiveJournal, its clones and the growth/size of fandom on them by monitoring the number of new posts and total comments to a selection of communities, which will then sorted by fandom so as to be able to compare the sizes of different fandom groups.

The sample community list is about 2,500 different communities.  It represents probably about 750 different fandoms.  The list isn’t 100% comprehensive because you can’t find every LiveJournal community based on a fandom and you can’t list every fandom.  And that’s what leaves me flummoxed.  How much time should be spent building a more comprehensive list of LiveJournal communities?  And InsaneJournal communities?

The thing with the sample is that I know going in that it won’t cover everything.  It isn’t possible.  It isn’t feasible.  The communities need to be manually vetted to make sure that while they might actually say list Twilight as a fandom, the community is actually about Twilight.  (And not say a community of pictures of sunsets.)   This list takes a lot of time to compile.  I’ve probably spent in the neighborhood of 24 hours compiling the list that was used for LiveJournal bot.  The updated list which will be used for this bot I’ve probably spent an equal amount of time compiling as I’ve needed to develop lists for InsaneJournal, JournalFen, Inksome, Scribbled, Blurty, DeadJournal and ivanovo.ru.  I could easily spend another week adding to the list beyond that, bringing the LiveJournal list to 5,000 communities and the InsaneJournal list to 1,000.  The other services have much less activity and fandom communities are much harder to find.  To a degree, it takes much more time to find those fandom communities for a much smaller list.  Two or three of those services are lucky to have five communities on them.

There are other issues. A lot of communities are long abandoned, not having been updated in years in some cases.  (This feels like it the case for smaller fandoms.)  They are never going to appear on any list of active fandoms as a result.  Including them feels necessary but also counterproductive because of the sparse amount of activity related to them.  Still, if we don’t have them in our list, how good of a sample do we really have?  And what is the cut off point?  I know for Fan History, we’ve posted to communities which haven’t had activity in more than a year… so new posts, new members, new comments are always possible.  Except probably in the case of role playing communities.  Those pretty much feel dead once the players have quit the game.

Another issue is sample size. How many communities is enough?  When do you stop the list?  Is it better to have fewer fandoms represented but to get a more communities represented for that fandom?  Or should we find one or two communities which we can have represent the whole of the fandom?  More fandoms or more communities per fandom?  I look at the Harry Potter and Twilight fandom lists and go ZOMG! Those huge fandoms only have about 20 communities in that sample!  They are HUGE! They should have at least 100!  Naruto, Inuyasha! Same deal! But we are still missing a whole slew of actors and television shows and anime and manga!

The dataset we are going to develop is going to be really, really interesting, and really, really useful.  It will help provide some data which can give a quantitative picture to exactly what is happening in parts of LiveJournal fandom.  It will help give a picture as to the size, comparitive size of various fandoms on LiveJournal.  You’ll also be able to examine the effect of certain events in the fandom to the size and amount of activity in fandom.  For instance, does a community being features on Fandom Wank lead to posting and membership spikes or a membership drop?  Does the release of canon cause an increase in posting volume, create a membership spike or both?  I’m really excited about getting this bot developed and up and operating.

In the meantime, you’ll see me over there busy working on adding to that list…

Did Twilight get a post movie fan fiction total bounce?

November 25th, 2008

I have a love affair with numbers and what they say about fandom. I was thus curious if the release of the Twilight movie meant an uptick in the number of stories published. I checked the data (November 19, data not gathered. November 20 data derived by dividing total by two) and it looks like it may have.

Twilight story totals in days after the movie's release

The daily average is about 123. 185 stories is a new record for the fandom. The fandom also consistently outpaced Naruto and Harry Potter which the fandom hadn’t done done for that length of time previously. It will be interesting to see if this increase in total stories posted levels off or if the numbers drop back down to pre-movie levels in another week or two.

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