Posts Tagged ‘sports’

Most popular team sports around the world

September 21st, 2009

I’ve been compiling a list of sports teams based on sport and country for a project I am working on for Fan History. The selection of teams now is around 33,000 teams. This information has come from FIFA, the NCAA, Wikipedia, sports federations and league websites. I think it could easily hit 40,000 if I spent some more time building the list. This list includes professional, semi-professional and some amateur teams that play in collegiate, national and international competitions.

Given all that, I was kind of curious… What countries are the most popular team sports? Based on this sample, I got created the following chart:

Number of teams by sports

There are a couple of issues with this list, especially when it comes to bicycling. I’m not familiar enough with the sport to understand the different versions or standard spellings for those variations.

Countries with the most sporting teams

September 21st, 2009

I’ve been compiling a list of sports teams based on sport and country for a project I am working on for Fan History. The selection of teams now is around 33,000 teams. This information has come from FIFA, the NCAA, Wikipedia, sports federations and league websites. I think it could easily hit 40,000 if I spent some more time building the list. This list includes professional, semi-professional and some amateur teams that play in collegiate, national and international competitions. 

Given all that, I was kind of curious… What countries have the most sports teams? Based on this sample, I got created the following chart:

 

Country

Number of teams

United States

20842

Australia

1792

Croatia

810

Canada

730

Spain

593

Norway

497

Sweden

398

Mexico

246

Turkey

243

England

236

NorthernIreland

205

Ireland

204

Belgium

200

Brazil

193

Bulgaria

173

Russia

148

New Zealand

138

United Kingdom

134

Scotland

132

Germany

127

China

122

Slovenia

116

The Netherlands

111

France

109

Ukraine

107

South Korea

104

Puerto Rico

102

Barbados

96

Portugal

94

Japan

93

Poland

93

Hong Kong

90

Thailand

90

Bosnia and Herzegovina

82

Taiwan

82

South Africa

81

Wales

76

Austria

74

Denmark

73

Iran

71

Switzerland

70

Hungary

62

Uruguay

61

Finland

58

India

58

Bermuda

55

Greece

54

Czech Republic

53

Singapore

53

Philippines

50

Belarus

49

Chile

49

Latvia

49

Slovakia

49

Romania

48

Pakistan

47

Botswana

46

Cameroon

46

Cuba

46

Malaysia

46

Montenegro

45

Iraq

43

Cyprus

42

Israel

42

Italy

42

Senegal

39

Nigeria

38

Afghanistan

37

Bahrain

35

Serbia

35

Bangladesh

34

Lithuania

34

Sri Lanka

34

Uganda

34

Argentina

32

Democratic Republic of the Congo

32

Estonia

32

Kazakhstan

32

Tanzania

32

Andorra

31

Algeria

30

Iceland

30

Morocco

29

Azerbaijan

28

Costa Rica

27

Lebanon

27

Syria

27

Yemen

27

Colombia

26

Indonesia

26

Kyrgyzstan

26

Macedonia

26

Oman

26

Solomon Islands

26

Sudan

26

Tajikistan

26

Angola

25

Egypt

25

Kiribati

25

Qatar

25

Georgia

24

Maldives

24

Zimbabwe

24

Benin

23

Kuwait

23

Lesotho

23

Malta

23

Côte d’Ivoire

22

Kenya

22

Niger

22

Congo

21

Ghana

21

Luxembourg

21

Ethiopia

20

Jamaica

20

Malawi

20

Papua New Guinea

20

Sierra Leone

20

Uzbekistan

20

American Samoa

19

Brunei Darussalam

19

Haiti

19

Libya

19

New Caledonia

19

Zambia

19

Fiji

18

Mali

18

Mozambique

18

Albania

17

Aruba

17

Burkina Faso

17

Nepal

17

Rwanda

17

Togo

17

Trinidad and Tobago

17

Tunisia

17

Bolivia

16

Ecuador

16

Gambia

16

Great Britain

16

Guatemala

16

Kosovo

16

Madagascar

16

Moldova

16

Swaziland

16

Tonga

16

Belize

15

Cape Verde Islands

15

Jordan

15

Mauritania

15

Mauritius

15

Mongolia

15

Namibia

15

Saint Kitts and Nevis

15

Samoa

15

Vietnam

15

Antigua and Barbuda

14

El Salvador

14

Gabon

14

United Arab Emirates

14

Armenia

13

Cambodia

13

Cayman Islands

13

Cook Islands

13

Grenada

13

Honduras

13

Macau

13

Niue

13

Palestine

13

Saudi Arabia

13

Turkmenistan

13

Bhutan

12

Dominican Republic

12

Faroe Islands

12

Netherlands Antilles

12

Panama

12

Paraguay

12

Suriname

12

Venezuela

12

Bahamas

11

Tahiti

11

Vanuatu

11

Seychelles

10

Tuvalu

10

Gibraltar

9

Guam

9

Nicaragua

9

Comoros

8

Greenland

8

Nauru

7

Palau

6

Turks and Caicos Islands

6

Dominica

5

Guyana

5

Netherlands

5

Central African Republic

4

Falkland Islands

4

Liechtenstein

4

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

4

San Marino

4

US Virgin Islands

4

Anguilla

3

Burundi

3

Djibouti

3

Eritrea

3

Guinea

3

Guinea-Bissau

3

Laos

3

Liberia

3

Myanmar

3

Norfolk Island

3

North Korea

3

Peru

3

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

3

Somalia

3

Soviet Union

3

Timor-Leste

3

Wallis and Futuna

3

British Virgin Islands

2

Chad

2

Equatorial Guinea

2

Korea

2

Monaco

2

Saint Helena

2

Saint Lucia

2

Tokelau

2

West Indies

2

Yugoslavia

2

Bonaire

1

Catalonia

1

Chuuk

1

Curaçao

1

Czechoslovakia

1

East Germany

1

England

1

Federated Malay States

1

French Guiana

1

Great Britain

1

Guadeloupe

1

Guernsey

1

Isle of Man

1

Jersey

1

Khazakstan

1

Leeward Islands

1

Marshall Islands

1

Martinique

1

Mayotte

1

Micronesia

1

Montserrat

1

New Zeeland

1

Northern Cyprus

1

Northern Ireland

1

Northern Mariana Islands

1

Pitcairn Islands

1

Pohnpei

1

Réunion

1

Saarland

1

Saba

1

Saint Martin

1

Sao Tome e

1

Sint Eustatius

1

Sint Maarten

1

Slovak Republic

1

Somaliland

1

South Vietnam

1

South Yemen

1

Straits Settlements

1

Transnistria

1

Vatican City

1

Wallonia

1

Western Sahara

1

Windward Islands

1

Yap

1

Zanzibar

1

 

This table needs to be fixed some.  Countries need to have their names standardized (Slovakia vs. Slovak Republic).  There are also issues regarding territories and what is considered a “nation.”  Still, it begins to give a good idea of the size and influence of team sports around the world.

Are you a sports fan looking to find others to play with you? Check out sportkin

September 14th, 2009

I hang out a lot in AboutUs‘s chatroom where I help with pro follows, creating articles and adding tags. Sometimes, I find some really cool people who are promoting their websites. Today, I found one such individual and I asked them to send me an intro about their site so I could post it to Fan History’s blog. Their site focuses around sports and I’m a huge sports nut. (I’d also like to see Fan History’s sports section improved.) This is what I got and I encourage you to check them out!

What is Sportkin – It’s the digital media platform designed to bring together individuals who share a common interest of sport.

About Sportkin:
It is our intention to unite  the Global sporting community,  Sportkin is pioneered to help all sports people in  finding other athletes of their own sporting interests and abilities, then unite, practice, and communicate together, hence perform better together. Sportkin serves many convenient functions to help athletes discover their full potential; furthermore, it brings tranquillity to ones sports lifestyle.

Key Features:

Members & Visitors:

* Find sports players*
* Find sporting Activities*

Members:

* Unite with sports people through a circle of kinship
* Communicate with members
* Create and manage* multiple sporting activities (and make it happen again within the click of a button)
* Participate in multiple sporting activities

What can Sportkin do?

Because Sportkin is consistently setting new targets and striving to achieve them, new features will be consistently introduced, it is thus the features listed below, may be less than the actual number of features on the website.
Twelve Reasons to Use Sportkin
1. Sport has no limits, so why limit yourself? There are close to 500 different types of sport on Sportkin to choose from!

2. For many of us sport is just for our spare time, and you might think it’s not necessary to join a website just to play sport, since you can easily go for a run by yourself or call a friend to go out and play. But it’s not always that easy, sometimes we need little nudge!

3. Sportkin is more than a social network, it’s a digital media platform designed to unite people with the common interest of sport. From sporting contacts to sporting activities, Sportkin has all the features you need to help you get sporty!

4. What if your friend or sports partner moves out of town one day, or is injured, or even worse, doesn’t like you any more? This could be the perfect excuse for you to stop playing sport, and you don’t want that to happen!

5. What if someone in your area is feeling depressed, lonely or left out? You could help cheer them up by playing a game of sport with them, and they may even be able to teach you something!

6. What if someone is new in your area? They might not have any friends to play sport with, and maybe you could help them find new friends – and maybe they could help you improve your game!

7. Just a few more to go! But if you want, you can join Sportkin first and come back to this page later. We’ll be here when you get back, because the only place Sportkin’s going is up! We already passed the point of no return back in 2005 when we first had the idea for this site.

8. There are also some people who might need a change of crowd, and as the saying goes: a parent is successful only when their child is successful! So why not get your parents into sport too? And remember – it’s not what your community can do for you, it’s what you can do for your community!

9. Thinking of getting into sport for the first time, or getting back into sport after a long holiday? You’ll be suprised how many others are too! Most Sportkin members arrived here after Googling “find a sports player”.

10. What if you’re a professional athlete? Don’t worry! There are other professional athletes on Sportkin too – in fact, Sportkin is for everyone, from beginners to pros. Each person’s skill level is checked against the other players they’re engaging in sporting activities with.

11. There are lots of cool and exciting features continuously being added to Sportkin, because we’re motivated by helping individuals to discover their full potential and move beyond!

12. Sportkin was designed to save you time. And best of all, Sportkin is free to join and free to use, so why not give Sportkin a try? It’s safe, secure and you have total control over your privacy!

If you have a passion for sport, and want to see world unity, then help Sportkin unite people through sport.
Add a link to your website from http://www.sportkin.com/info/resources01.php

P.S If you know of anyone looking to get into or back into sport, tell them to signup at sportkin. Its free to join, and free to use. Thank you

» Read more: Are you a sports fan looking to find others to play with you? Check out sportkin

Help:Fanzines

June 23rd, 2009

We’ve created a Help page for fanzines.  It really needs some additional work in terms of categories, titles, etc.  We wanted something up officially to address concerns have have appeared regarding preservation movements around media fanzines.  The following is our current version.


Purpose

The purpose of Fan History’s fanzine articles is to preserve the history of fanzines in the community. Fanzines have long been an important part of all areas of fandom: music, media, science fiction, sports, and punk, just to name a few. Fanzines provide a window into a specific time in fandom history; trends in writing, art and discussion; as well as many other aspects of fandom life and creativity which can be important in understanding the history of fandom.

That said, Fan History recognizes the issues that can exist in providing documentation of materials that may have been meant to be transient in nature, or may include information considered sensitive that creators and contributors may not wish to be publicly accessible today. Our policies regarding fanzine articles, artwork and content have been designed to provide both freedom of contributors to add information they consider valuable to fannish history, as well as avenues for creators to request removal of material they do not wish to have listed or archived electronically in any fashion.

Our promise

Fan History promises to never digitally provide the majority or entire contents of a fanzine on Fan History without consent of the fanzine publisher. If a publisher and individual contributors specifically wish for their materials to be archived for posterity, we can work with those individuals to provide hosting of such content. In general, however, our fanzine entries include a brief description of contents (including a table of contents when available), cover art (when available), publication history, a description of its relevance to fandom, and fan reactions.

Fanzine article deletion

See Help:Article deletion#Fanzine article deletion request.

Fanzine cover art deletion

See Help:Article deletion#Fan art and fanzine covers.

Template

A template for fanzine can be found at Template:Fanzine. To use this template, search for the fanzine title. If it does not exist, click on “Create this page.” In a different window/tab, click edit on Template:Fanzine. Copy and paste the contents of Template:Fanzine to your new blank article. Fill out as much information as possible.

Sports fan fiction fandom

June 9th, 2009

I found this on my hard drive. It dates back to June 2006. In all the time I’ve been doing Fan History, I don’t know if I have expanded my knowledge of sportfic fandom beyond this much.


SportsFic history is something difficult to construct. If you’re in main stream fan fiction culture, you may never stumble upon it. If you’re in BandFic, ActorFic or PoliSlash communities, you are still probably unlikely to stumble upon it. It is and it isn’t. SportsFic is one of the smaller, less visible fannish communities.

Some fan fiction community dates are relatively easy to pin down. The Star Trek fan fiction community was started in 1967 with the publication of Spockanalia. The BandFic community date is harder to pin down but the zines were definitely present by the 1983 when Comet Bus was published. The Harry Potter fan fiction community was started by 1999 on FanFiction.Net. SportsFic lacks even this much clarity.

Sports was clearly defined as a fandom as early as 1908. [1] What this meant at that time in the context of sports is not the same as most modern fen would use the word. The technology to facilitate community was just not there. The tradition of writing fictional stories about real people in a sporting context was not there. [2] The community demographics of modern fandom that go to support fan fiction were not present. The culture that allowed writing of stories that featured sexually explicit stories was not there. It did not resemble fandom as most fen define it.

In the period between 1908 and 1950, histories of sports fan behavior and sports fandom do not describe anything that look like fan fiction. The first inkling of sports fandom involving fan fiction first emerged in the 1950s, in the post World War II era. This is the period when wrestling fiction began. [3] The wrestling community that created this material tended to be female, with some sixty percent of the audience to live events being composed of women and ninety percent of the television audience being female. This group of fen started creating their own fannish materials, including fanzines and the writing of fictional stories about real wrestling stars. They would continue on with this activity well into the 1960s. After that, the history of the community is some what neglected, with out much research done on the community.

Following wrestling fiction, there is a void of knowledge. [4] Was there sports fic going on? It seems highly probable given that bandfic was similar and had a tradition of putting fictional stories about band members into fanzines. And sports fandom had fanzines. There are tons of them to be found. In the period between 1960 and 1995, these included but are not limited to the following fanzines: Leyton Orientear, Scottish Athletic Journal, Foul!, Sick as a Parrot, Combat Sports, Fan-Club Bulletin, Paper Tiger and The Northern Light.

The internet proved to be a bit of a boon to SportsFic. For the first time, the material was more easily findable, more easily publishable and it was easier to people to find like minded fen. It also helped bring sportsfic communities into contact with other communities. There is important because unlike ActorFic and BandFic, there is no indication that SportsFic had contact with traditional media fan fiction communities prior to this and even for a number of years after the material was first put on-line. Sadly, like BandFic, it appears that the early other community contact that SportsFic had was with the erotica community. This community was found on Nifty in 1993.

From that early home, SportsFic appeared to go to Usenet. By 1997, figure skating, baseball, football began to discuss issues that laid a framework for story writing including speculation on athlete orientation, eating disorders and more. These discussions would result in such archives as SkateFic. The presence of the speculation lead to the creation of mailing lists and fan fiction archives located off Usenet. The SportsFic community was helped in 1998 with the creation of FanFiction.Net. While the archive did not set out to create a community where SportsFic could be posted, it hosted a number of SportsFic stories in the original and other categories. The ability to create free mailing lists also helped the nascent community. RS-X and FFN-Slashers-Unite were just two of the mailing lists that helped to expand the community. They also offered platforms to promote more specific communities. These mailing lists in turn begat a number of small, author centered fan fiction archives. Archives were considered large if they had twenty stories on them.

SportsFic became some what more tolerable in parts of the traditional media fan fiction community because of the ambiguity of some of the fandoms. Fan fiction based on professional wrestling was not quite real person fic like actorfic because the wrestlers were putting on a show for the fans, partially based on themselves but heavily scripted towards making it fiction. This ambiguity allowed SportsFic fen to put their material

When, in 2002, FanFiction.Net banned all real person fic, some parts of the SportsFic community reeled. The biggest communities that were affected were the baseball, wrestling and racing communities. What would rescue them would be the ease of creating mailing lists, new automated fan fiction archive scripts, low cost for web hosting and LiveJournal. LiveJournal’s role can not be understated. It created a number of communities that might otherwise not have existed or would have remained very small. These communities included horse racing, swimming, baseball, football, women’s basketball, women’s soccer, Nascar and Formula One, skiing, gymnastics, skeleton and curling. It was helped along in other areas by the creation of such archives as FanDomination.Net and FanWorks.Org.

All these different avenues of story sharing did not narrow down. Members of the SportsFic continued to post to LiveJournal, to mailing lists, to automated archives, and to personal fan fiction archives. This expanding of the horizons is probably the reason that, by 2003, SportsFic began to come to the attention of the athletes themselves and that legal issues. In March of 2003, FanDomination.Net would get a cease and desist letter from the representative of Andy Petitte. In 2005, an Ohio State University Buckeye women’s basketball saffic writer would receive a similar letter and be kicked out of the Buckeye booster club.

Even with all these things happening in the SportsFic community, the crossover with traditional media fan fiction communities did not happen. Most members of traditional media fan fiction communities seem blissfully unaware of SportsFic. SportsFic community members give the appearance of being aware of possible reactions to the material and not forcing it on unsuspecting people. Terms have migrated to SportsFic from traditional media fan fiction community including fan fiction, real person fic, Mary Sue and slash. Given the long period of isolation, it seems unlikely that sportsfic will ever fully integrate into the traditional media fan fiction community.

[1] Chicago Daily Tribune used the word fandom several times in the context of baseball fans.
[2] Roman-a-clef, what could be seen as a precursor for some real person fic, was being written but it tended to focus on literary figures.
[3] See: Fiske, John. Researching Historical Broadcast Audiences: Female Fandom of Professional Wrestling, 1945-1960. Diss. Univ. of Wisconsin – Madison, 1997. 5 Apr. 2006.
[4] For more information on the problem with fanzine histories, see: Hall, H. & Smith, N. (1997). You’ll wish it was all over: the bibliographic control of grey literature with reference to print football fanzines. Serials, 10(2), 189-194.

PRESS RELEASE: Fan History is Breaking Wiki Size Barriers

June 6th, 2009

In May 2009, Fan History became the biggest MediaWiki-based wiki that is not affiliated with the Wikimedia Foundation.

Sleepy Hollow, Illinois – If you are looking for information about fans and all the activities they engage in, you need to check out Fan History Wiki located at http://www.fanhistory.com/ . In May 2009, in trying to become the best resource of its kind, Fan History became the biggest MediaWiki-based wiki that is not part of the Wikimedia Foundation with over 750,000 articles.

Fan History’s accomplishment has been several years in the making.  Since May 2006, the project has been working on documenting the history of fan communities.  Fan History started with some basic history information that had originally been found on FanFiction.Net.  The focus had been on media fandom and fan fiction.  In 2007, the focus changed and became broader and less focused on fan fiction.  In 2008, Fan History created a directory of members of the fan community and added over half a million articles in the process of doing that.  Fan History also added statistical information that updates daily; the wiki tracks the growth of fan fiction and LiveJournal communities representing over 4,000 television shows, anime shows, musical groups, actors and video games.  In 2009, Fan History continued its expansion and breadth of topics covered.  This was done by adding articles about fanzines, musical groups, movies and episodes of television. At every step, the fandom community responded, helped improve many of our stubs and added new content.

Fan History’s place as the biggest wiki of its kind is good news for those seeking to document the history of fandom.  The size of the wiki has led to an increase in traffic and number of contributors.  It has meant that important or interesting things in fandom have been documented for others to learn from.  This includes covering events such as the kerfuffle over Russet Noon in the Twilight fan community, how Dreamwidth Studios was viewed within the LiveJournal fan community, on going issues related to racism in fandom, how Police fans responded to the concert tour, and the current and past role of fanzines in fandom.   Many of these events are not covered elsewhere.  The current size and scope of the project makes this possible where other wikis and projects not in wiki format cannot.

For a list of the largest MediaWikis, see http://s23.org/wikistats/largest_html.php .

About Fan History LLC:

Fan History is a collaborative project like none other currently serving the fandom community. Its core function is as a wiki which allows members of fandom – men and women, young and old – to actively participate in documenting the history of their various fandoms, share current news which may impact their experiences, as well as creating an easily searchable web index of related communities, projects, and activities. It gives members of fandom a chance to share current fandom news that may impact people’s experiences in fandom. Fan History users can also promote their own creative projects, and share opinions with fellow fans and alert them to scams and questionable practices encountered within fandom. By providing these resources, Fan History allows users to celebrate their activities, whichever corner of fandom they come from: anime, cartoons, comics, movies, politics, radio, science fiction, sports, television, theater, and video games.

33,155 fandoms and growing…

May 15th, 2009

roflcopter flew in to Fan History again yesterday.  This time, the goal was to create music fandom stubs and it did that to the tune of 17,000 groups.  We’re really happy with this as we’ve wanted to expand that section for a long time.  There are just so many groups that it can be intimidating as to where to start exactly.  If you’re in music and there isn’t an article about a band you want to see mentioned, drop us a line and we’ll help you create one.  If you know people who could help improve our music section, we’d be extremely grateful.

With this growth, Fan History now has an article about or references 33,155 plus fandoms…  Below is a breakdown of those fan communities by type.

  • Actors – 275 fandoms
  • Anime – 550 fandoms
  • Books – 450 fandoms
  • Cartoons – 200 fandoms
  • Comics – 100 fandoms
  • Movies – 13,000 fandoms
  • Music – 17,605 fandoms
  • Politics – 5 fandoms
  • Radio – 35 fandoms
  • Sports – 125 fandoms
  • Table top gaming – 5 fandoms
  • Television – 750 fandoms
  • Theater – 30 fandoms
  • Video games – 250 fandoms
  • unsorted fandoms – 500 fandoms [1]

Total fandom estimate: 33,155

Total fandoms represented on Fan History? Lots and lots.

March 30th, 2009

If you haven’t been watching Fan History’s recent changes page, you might not have noticed it but we’ve steadily been working on clearing out our wanted categories. In the past 10 days or so, we’ve taken that from over 4,500 categories being wanted to what amounts to zero. Along the way, we’ve probably created a bit of a monster in that we’ve found several capitalization issues, several issues with articles appearing or not appearing in categories, etc. Those problems will get resolved over time and will be much easier to address now because we know those categories actually exist and have articles in them. All this category creation has given us reason to reflect on our category organization methods. We’ve subsequently updated our category help page.

Getting to the main point, all this category structure means we have a much better idea of how many fan communities are represented on Fan History. We don’t have a firm count because there is some crossover for things like Star Trek which is both a television show, movie and cartoon. These are estimates based on fandom categories.

  • Actors – 275 fandoms
  • Anime – 550 fandoms
  • Books – 450 fandoms
  • Cartoons – 200 fandoms
  • Comics – 100 fandoms
  • Movies – 1000 fandoms
  • Music – 475 fandoms
  • Politics – 5 fandoms
  • Radio – 35 fandoms
  • Sports – 125 fandoms
  • Table top gamining – 5 fandoms
  • Television – 750 fandoms
  • Theater – 30 fandoms
  • Video games – 250 fandoms
  • unsorted fandoms – 500 fandoms

    Total fandoms: 4,025

  • Women don’t write fandom history?

    January 18th, 2009

    Fan History’s sports section is pretty awful. Really awful. It is downright pitiful. And that’s really sad as I’m a huge sports nut and I know my Chicago Cubs sports fandom history fairly well. I and Fan History’s other admins have just not invested time in improving it because really, sometimes, why bother?

    Sports fandom has traditionally been dominated by guys and they’ve done a lot to document the history of fans. Heck, there is a whole cottage history dedicated to documenting the thuggery that goes down in soccer (football) fandom. This academic work has traditionally been done by guys. It is really well done.

    Media fandom has traditionally been dominated by women and they haven’t done much to document the history of fans. There have been a few things done here and there but most of the research focuses on the product itself. If fans are looked at, it is from perspective of how they interact with the product rather than how fans interact with each other. It is totally different from sports fandom. So women aren’t writing fandom history and aren’t writing the history of their own communities.

    Of course, this could be something that isn’t a gender issue. It could be a product issue. In sports fandom that tends to be historically dominated by guys, the product and fans aren’t really separate; they share an identity. You can’t really talk about the Chicago Cubs with out talking about its fans. (And if you’re a Sox fan talking about the Cubs, you can’t do it with out slagging on us.) Sports owners encourage that and really crank out the merchandise so fans can brand themselves as fans of a team. Our culture totally supports that by having “Support your team dress day!” type days at work. My local Jewel does that when the Green Bay Packers play the Chicago Bears and employees are encouraged to support their team. Sports fandom also continues on and on. Teams generally don’t collapse/disappear over night and many have histories that are 20+ years old. They have a product you can get behind and have the time to get behind as the background for your life.

    Media fandom is different. The producers frequently don’t encourage that sort of relationship with the source. In a number of cases, they treated their most loyal fans as thieves or belittled them, telling them to get a life. When we think of Harry Potter and Twilight, most people outside of fandom don’t immediately think of the canon as batshit insane because the fans are batshit are insane. Most fans aren’t flaunting their relationship with the show in a way that a whole town could relate to and have special dress days for. Media fandom’s products also lack the time lasting factor. When Sex and the City went off the air, women picked a different show to watch or found another way to identify.

    So women generally aren’t writing fandom history. There are a few notable exceptions. Fan History is one but our major contributors early on came from spaces dominated by guys or from educational backgrounds where the approach more systematic, quantitative, regimented. Some of the other exceptions came out of competition with other women.

    Will this pattern radically change ever? Probably not. Women might write sports fandom history (And they do. Some have found walls that their sisters in media fandom haven’t encountered because of their gender.)  but they will probably remain in the minority for a long time. Women are so closely identified with media fandom and the source code has those identity issues that I see it as a huge barrier to overcome, and that won’t ever be overcome in terms of similar participation by men in sports fandom history documenting.

    How many fandoms are represented on Fan History?

    January 18th, 2009

    About a week ago, I was asked by some one how many fandoms were represented on Fan History and I had problems coming up with a number. Why? Because Fan History is a work in progress. For some fandoms, we have articles but they aren’t found in a category that makes them easily countable. Some articles don’t have categories because we just have one article in that subcategory so we don’t bother. Some of our articles were created by bots. While we’ve been hard at work trying to make categories, subcategories and build the framework for them, we’re talking over 5,000 categories and that takes a lot of work.

    So that aside, let’s try to get a picture of how many fandoms are represented on Fan History by seeing how big some of our important categories are.

    Misc

  • Fan fiction community size – 2,111 fandoms
  • LiveJournal community size by fandom – 999 fandoms
  • Actors

  • Actor fandoms – 322 fandoms
  • Actor fans – 41 fandoms
    A lot of these articles were created because LiveJournal communities were based on them or in an effort to create articles for people who visit our site through FanPop and Chickipedia. A lot of these fandoms are smaller so high possibility that there are another 100 actor fandoms on Fan History that aren’t picked up because of LiveJournal related bots.Anime
  • Anime fandoms -304 fandoms
  • Anime fandom categories – 374 fandoms
  • Anime fans – 299 fans
  • Anime LiveJournal communities – 20 fandoms
    A lot of anime fandoms are really, really small. FanFiction.Net related bots picked them up. We just haven’t built categories for them because we haven’t always spotted them. And when we do spot them, we’re not always creating articles for them. We found an anime fandom recently where there were over 2000 articles in subcategories but no actual article about the show itself. I’d guess that’s the high number? Add another 200 and you’ll get a feel for the number of anime fandoms.Books
  • Book fandoms – 220 fandoms
  • Book fandom categories – 287 fandoms
  • Book fans – 181 fans
  • Book LiveJournal communities – 13 fandoms
    We’re planning on adding a number of new book fandoms to Fan Fiction Stat Bot, to the tune over over 100 fandoms. That should ratchet up the number of fandoms represented by another 100. There are probably another 100 not showing up because of FanFiction.Net connected bots.Cartoons
  • Cartoon fandoms – 63 fandoms
  • Cartoons fandom categories – 120 fandoms
  • Cartoons fans – 125 fandoms
    I’d hazard a guess of another 25 fandoms floating around the site. This category just doesn’t feel like it has the sheer number of fandoms to draw from to begin with to have a lot of hidden categories and articles.Comics
  • Comics fandoms – 48 fandoms
  • Comics fandoms categories – 59 fandoms
  • Comics fans – 41 fandoms
    Like cartoons, this is a pretty small type of fandom that is compounded in its difficulty to count and create articles for because of all the crossovers canon-wise, with new comics spun off based on characters, etc. There are probably another 25 fandoms not yet categorized in those groups yet.Movies
  • Movie fandoms – 221 fandoms
  • Movie fandom categories – 338 fandoms
  • Movie fans – 265 fandoms
    Movie fandoms might have some additional fan categories to the tune of another 100 or so. Like actor fandoms, unless there is more than 1 article in a category, categories generally aren’t created for it. FanFiction.Net related articles weren’t picked up by Fan Fiction Stat Bot because we wanted to get the bot done faster and generally assumed those fandoms weren’t as active. There are probably 100 to 250 wanted articles for movies on actor-related articles where we’ve listed what fandoms actors appeared in.Music
  • Music fandoms – 377 fandoms
  • Music fandom categories – 383 fandoms
  • Music fans – 67 fandoms
  • Music LiveJournal communities – 33 fandoms
  • Music images – 44 fandoms
    This broad subcategory has had a few stewards and hasn’t had the articles added by bots that the other ones have had. Where it did, most of the categories already existed. I’d guess at most that another 50 fandoms are represented.Politics
  • Politics fandom categories – 1 fandom
  • Politics fandoms – 6 fandoms
    This is one of those main categories that is a mess. There probably aren’t more than 4 additional fandoms. No one has really put the time and effort into organizing and fixing this category so it just isn’t represented. (That should really change.)Radio
  • Radio fans – 2 fandoms
  • Radio fandoms – 33 fandoms
  • Radio fandom categories – 31 fandoms
    This is another neglected category like politicians. It should have more but doesn’t. It might have another 10 fandoms, mostly ones that are part of other mediums.Science fiction
  • Science fiction fandoms – 38 fandoms
  • Science fiction fans – 2 fandoms
    These categories mostly are pulled from other categories like books, television and movies. There are probably another 300 categories but they overlap everything else ,so take that with a grain of salt. We really need someone to sort through and better categorize those shows. Our emphasis on this category so far has been conventions, culture and terminology when building here.Sports
  • Baseball – 10 fandoms
  • Basketball – 4 fandoms
  • Figure skating – 2 fandoms
  • Football – 8 fandoms
  • Football fans – 3 fandoms
  • Hockey teams – 5 fandoms
  • Soccer fans – 3 fandoms
  • Sports fandom categories – 17 fandoms
    Sports fandom is a total mess because you’re not dealing with a major broad category but a category per sport. No one has spent much time improving the organization or working on articles in this area. We have a number of fandoms based on my and Sidewinder’s sports team interests. A few were picked up by LiveJournal bot. It looks like 50 total but better counting and sorting things out from uncategorized categories and uncategorized articles, I think we’d have another 50 fandoms.Television
  • Television fandoms – 457
  • Television fandom categories – 545 fandoms
  • Television fans – 414 fandoms
    As Fan history came out of media fandom with some music and television fans, I’m not surprised this is really large. I’d hazard a guess we have another 150 categories and articles from various television fandoms floating around the site.
    Theater
  • Theater fandoms – 7 fandoms
  • Theater fandom categories – 14 fandoms
  • Theater fans – 13 fandoms
    This is just one of those other neglected fandom categories. Not much there and no one has spent a lot of time updating those articles. I’d estimate another 10 fandoms just because there hasn’t been a goal of adding categories and articles.
    Video games
  • Video game fandoms – 84 fandoms
  • Video game fandom categories – 187 fandoms
  • Video game fans – 159 fandoms
    This category is one of those that has a lot of categories because people helped complete wanted categories based on articles the bots created. Lots of articles missing but categories created. The category was better maintained a year ago when one of major contributors was more active. I’d guess another 50 fandoms here because not the biggest category ever.
    Based on the biggest number of fandoms (besides sports where we just added them up and misc which duplicated a lot of things in our existing categories) for each subheading, we have a total of 2,761 fandoms represented on Fan History. If you add up our total estimates for fandoms that aren’t counted where they are supposed to be, we probably have 3,635 fandoms represented on Fan History.

    That’s a lot of fandoms. And we haven’t even begun to really document many of those are touch all the fan communities that are out there.

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