Posts Tagged ‘journalfen’

What’s popular on Fan History for the week of July 5 to July 11!

July 13th, 2009

Some things in our top actually changed. A lot of this is the result of individual linking. I’ve also included our top blog entries in this week’s wrap up. They don’t generally get as many views as articles but do go towards demonstrating that some of our more news related posts get a fair amount of traffic. Most of these news related posts are unrelated to fandom news that is featured on LiveJournal communities like metafandom. Interesting stuff.

Fan History’s Most Popular Articles
11,152 pages were viewed a total of 44,564 times

  1. Draco/Hermione – 1,013
  2. AdultFanFiction.Net – 905 views
  3. Cassandra_Claire – 488 views
  4. Naruto – 339 views
  5. FanDomination.Net – 324 views
  6. Sakura Lemon_Fan-Fiction Archive – 298 views
  7. Merlin – 249 visits
  8. Digimon – 234 visits
  9. FanFiction.Net – 234 visits
  10. James Nicoll – 223 visits

Fan History’s Most Popular Blog Entries
124 pages were viewed a total of 939 times

  1. Michael Jackson fanfiction: is it out there? – 477 views. Entry by Sidewinder.
  2. The high cost of conventions – when will it become TOO high? – 66 views. Entry by Sidewinder.
  3. Panic at the Disco break up – 48 views. Entry by sidewinder.
  4. Update: Permabanned users policy change – 48 views. Entry by Laura.
  5. Does familiarity breed contempt (and breakups?) – 29 views. Entry by Sidewinder.
  6. Laura’s link building philosophy – 22 views. Entry by Laura.
  7. Not a parody? Then not fair use. Precedent is bad news for argument that fan fiction is legal! – 16 views. Entry by Laura.
  8. Torchwood post-Children of Earth – 12 views. Entry by Sidewinder.
  9. Pictures from Chicago’s Pride Parade – 10 views. Entry by Laura.
  10. Why Australian fansites – and fans – need to be careful with Shotacon – 10 views. Entry by Sidewinder.

Fan History’s Keyword Traffic
Search sent 13,821 total visits via 9,244 keywords

  1. adultfanfiction – 333 visits
  2. adult fanfiction - 176 visits
  3. fandomination – 105 visits
  4. michael jackson fanfiction – 90 visits
  5. naruto wiki - 79 visits
  6. bandflesh - 77 visits
  7. michael jackson fan fiction – 75 visits
  8. restricted section – 71 visits
  9. adult fan fiction – 63 visits
  10. draco hermione – 58 visits

Fan History’s Referrer Traffic
Referring sites sent 2,519 visits via 500 sources

  1. animenewsnetwork.com
  2. mademan.com – Replaced Chickipedia
  3. community.livejournal.com
  4. james-nicoll.livejournal.com
  5. fanfiction.net
  6. fanpop.com
  7. tvtropes.org
  8. journalfen.net – fandom_wank traffic began to taper off. 47 visits.
  9. sidewinder.livejournal.com – 47 visits. Links to her blog entries on her LiveJournal.
  10. facebook.com

What’s hot on Fan History for June 14 to June 20, 2009

June 21st, 2009

More Fan History traffic information and looking at what is popular. This edition includes our most popular traffic sources outside search, our most popular articles and our most popular keyword based searches for the week of June 14 to June 20, 2009.

Most popular articles
11,909 pages were viewed a total of 43,428 times

  1. Draco/Hermione – 785 times
  2. Cassandra Claire – 359 times
  3. Race Fail 2009 – 338 times
  4. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive – 329 times
  5. Russet Noon – 233 times
  6. AdultFanFiction.Net – 228 times
  7. Naruto – 200 times
  8. FanFiction.Net – 195 times
  9. Hurt/Comfort – 194 times
  10. Digimon – 175 times
  11. Laura – 144 times

Our most popular pages mostly had fewer views this month. Some of this is probably because we had 600 fewer article views this past week.

Top non-search referrers
Referring sites sent 2,435 visits via 337 sources

  1. animenewsnetwork.com – 301 visits
  2. chickipedia.com – 233 visits
  3. community.livejournal.com – 147 visits
  4. journalfen.net – 126 visits
  5. fanfiction.net – 96 visits
  6. twitter.com – 84 visits
  7. partly-bouncy.livejournal.com – 80 visits
  8. fanpop.com – 78 visits
  9. tvtropes.org – 63 visits
  10. deviantart.com – 47 visits

200 fewer visits this past week from referrers. A lot of this can be attributed to getting less traffic related from fandom_wank. There were a few sources that moved up or down. There was only one site that dropped off and one new one appearing.

Search key phrases
Search sent 11,657 total visits via 8,264 keywords

  1. emo porn – 87 visits
  2. galbadia hotel – 66 visits
  3. naruto wiki – 59 visits
  4. restricted section – 47 visits
  5. adult fanfiction – 46 visits
  6. gosselins without pity – 46 visits
  7. adultfanfiction – 39 visits
  8. draco hermione – 38 visits
  9. sakura lemon – 36 visits
  10. fanhistory – 34 visits

Our search traffic was a bit down this past week. This was by about 400 visits and 300 key phrases. Some terms moved up and other terms moved down.

What was hot on Fan History for the week of June 7 to June 13, 2009

June 15th, 2009

It’s another week and I’m in the mood for another post about what’s popular on Fan History. This edition includes our most popular traffic sources outside search, our most popular articles and our most popular keyword based searches for the week of June 7 to June 13, 2009.

Most popular articles
11,848 pages were viewed a total of 44,012 times

  1. Draco/Hermione – 920 times
  2. Cassandra Claire – 551 times
  3. Race Fail 2009 – 423 times
  4. Torchsong Chicago – 383 times
  5. Sakura Lemon Fan-Fiction Archive – 323 times
  6. AdultFanFiction.Net – 282 times
  7. Digimon – 226 times
  8. Hurt/comfort – 225 times
  9. Naruto – 225 times
  10. Twilight – 216 times

Coming in Number 11 is Russet Noon with 206 and FanFiction.Net with 204.

Top non-search referrers
Referring sites sent 2,620 visits via 361 sources

  1. journalfen.net – blog entry about conventions is where the traffic was from – 298 visits
  2. animenewsnetwork.com – 287 visits
  3. chickipedia.com – 232 visits
  4. community.livejournal.com – 179 visits
  5. twitter.com – 83 visits
  6. twilighted.net – 81 visits
  7. fanfiction.net – 79 visits
  8. deviantart.com – 67 visits
  9. tvtropes.org – 61 visits
  10. fanpop.com – 57 visits

Coming in at referer rank 77 was russet-noon.com with 4 visits.

Search key phrases
Search sent 12,029 total visits via 8,537 keywords

  1. naruto wiki – 64 visits
  2. adultfanfiction – 60 visits
  3. galbadia hotel – 53 visits
  4. restricted section – 50 visits
  5. adult fanfiction – 49 visits
  6. cassandra claire – 44 visits
  7. emo porn – 43 visits
  8. fan history – 35 visits
  9. cassandra clare – 34 visits
  10. gosselins without pity – 33 visits

Coming in at the 40th most popular keyword search with 17 visits was russet noon.

WisCon: Something Wrong on the Internet

May 24th, 2009

This is the panel on Something Wrong on the Internet. It is hosted by Liz Henry, Piglet, Julia Sparkymonster, Vito Excalibur. Panelists agreed to talk over each other.

(Reporting this as an audience member and reporting on what other says.)

Why harsh on people’s squee? This thing starts off on race!fail references and just kept going. “Really. It is just the Internet.” That it is discarded because we have these conversations in real life, at places like conventions. Internet can be a better place to have some conversations because you can walk away. And you can decide how much time you want to spend on it. Walking away is good because you can think and reflect better.

Some Internet conversations have offline components.

Piglet says she has learned a lot from online conversations. She has learned that she doesn’t hate her body because of these conversations. Don’t be discouraged.

Other people talked. Sometimes, it takes time to learn things. It might take three years before they get the point you made. They might not understand why you freaked them out at the time.

Panel had a hard time with internet conversations that changed their mind. (Then some one came up with that they learned about mock Spanish and changed their mind. )

One did say they learned how ignorant they are on some topics. Sometimes, that can be extremely helpful to learn.

Personal connections can help make learning easier when people are mean to you.

PoC hive mind does not exist. This was something that some one learned.

People learned how to respond when some one accused them of being racist or classist.

Panel discussed Heidipologies. Good example:”I am so sorry people are so hard to trust. I am sorry people are being so mean to me.”

Ruby!Fail is a guy who does porn slides at a tech conference and made people uncomfortable. Pearl Guy did the same thing but he made a good apology. He didn’t repeat. Ruby on rails people said “We need more porn in our slides.” They didn’t get why women were offended at comparisons to porn.

When you fuck up? Online, not comment immediately. Wait a while. Tell people you need to take a moment, stop commenting and formulating a way to response. Locked posts on LiveJournal are key to being an ass hole. Sit with discomfort and try to figure out what you did wrong. Then apologize and mean it, even if you didn’t get it. Don’t say you didn’t get it.

What happens if you do it wrong? Is there a pathway for apologizing? You can give them shit. You don’t need to accept their apology. It is okay. It depends on how people react when you do wrong. You need to shut up. Or you need to explain it and be done with it.

If you never shut up about things, then you will continue to be mobbed.

Can you participate in online drama if you don’t have time to dedicated to it? Answer is yes. You can digest chunks of it. You can toss in comments a few weeks or months after the fact because the Internet is asynchronous. You can also follow by tracking one or two bloggers who follow that subject.

When all your Internet friends are participating, you should participate in the conversation.

Internet Drama is, according to Liz Henry, a form of the news. Twitter is a good place to keep track of some drama online.

Failblog.com is already purchased.

What are the main dramas? (Reference to great blow job wars of 2005 in the feminist blogosphere.) Conversation around that question got derailed.

You have to know the right people in order to know what is going on online. Overlapping but non-identical spheres mean that you can totally miss things like Race!Fail. (And if you don’t know about some of this drama, people would explode.)

JournalFen, Fandom_Wank, Link_Spam on Dreamwidth, metafandom on LiveJournal can help you keep track of fandom drama online.

Asking people before going to a convention what is going is important so you can be prepared for events like WisCon.

Following Coffeeandink is good because you can follow the drama that is going on.

Recent Drama: WisCon picture posting with Rachel Moss was big. Rachel Moss and the_ferret both chances to talk about their experiences with the fail.

A feminist author said don’t talk about some one with out telling them that you’re going to talk about them. Ask them if they want to participate in the conversation. The act of doing that can help change your perspective.

Fail can keep you honest.

Then conversation back to listing recent fail.

Race Fail!

Mammoth!Fail.

Seal Press!Fail.

Seal Press involved publishing feminist bloggers. The publishing house then jumped the shark with their illustrations for the book. They had illustrations like spear chucking African women who were bad. The hero to save them was a white amazonian type female. The press was told all about this and how it was offensive. They didn’t change their behavior or modify their behavior. The press accused people of being jealous of her writing, her awesomeness and her having a book published. It was when she got defensive and whined about it that made the situation and made the whole thing explode a lot worse.

Another time, Seal Press told some black author that the book needed more white people. The publisher trolled comments to explain them.

Another awesome fail was digital colonialism.

Some one asked why white women would read anything about black women?

Seal Press has acted like a jerk face, claimed they were okay because they had a black employee.

Seal Press was weird because she could be an ally in many ways but disappointed people because she wasn’t.

How do you interact with people who fail in some ways? As a feminist, you should probably try to keep those allies, keep those connections even though it is hard. It can take a few months sometimes to get past though hard moments of fail.

How do you handle when say your Guest of Honor does major fail two weeks before the convention? Question from the audience. Conversation then got derailed.

Liz Henry wanted spontaneous panel for mammoth fail.

OSC was invited to a con. Orson Scott Card had done homophobic rants. People were upset. The ConCom realized they could not pull back his invitation. ConCom invited people to discuss it with them. ConCom had some one follow Orson Scott Card around so they could make sure he did not vomit homophobic comments at people. ConCom has to address it in some way. It should be dependent on the ConCom. (The bar is set that anything is better than say “People are over reacting.” It is pretty low.)

In many online conversations, only people who show up are ones that agree with you. This can be a huge thing to overcome. There are ways to do that if you can say find people who can respectfully engage.

Will Shetterly was mentioned. Will Shetterly’s name has an asterick. A panelist do not think that they could have a respectful conversation with him.

One panelist said that if they talk to you in non-macros, it means they think that they can actually engage with the person.

Part of the joy of internet drama is making macros and funny LiveJournal icons. Also great? Bingo cards.

Humor can be really important in defusing some of the major drama.

What do you do when you know and love some one who ends up being a major giant ass hole online? This is the part where one person hates principles and having them. It is really hard to handle that. Sometimes you can call them out. Sometimes you can’t. If doing it, reaffirm that you are still friends, that you respect them and that you are doing that as an act of love because you think they can handle being called out. (and people should be able to take that out. But more often than not, they can’t.)

How does it feel like being the actual target? Total strangers misunderstanding what you did is annoying. Calling out perfect strangers is the spirit of the Internet. How you do that though should be different than people you know.

Hint of a fail is when a person says “There is a mob after me!” Flail is different.

Audrey Lord discusses reuses of anger. People have strong reactions to people being angry.

You catch more flies with honey but who wants flies? Sometimes, there is no way to respond in a way that will make people happy. Even no matter how nice you are. Some people will just respond one way based on their perspective.

Is the goal that some people have zero fail? Are people afraid of fucking up? Do they remain silent for that reason? Do people hope for a fail less universe? If that is true, then it means that no hard discussions are happening. There is less of an opportunity to learn.

You see a gigantic fail happening. You sit on your hands and not post on it. Then you start thinking that yeah. Panelist said that you should ignore guilt. People don’t care. A panelist said that the questioner said that posting about your own ignorance and explain things and linking is just as supportive as many other things.

How not to burn out? This is an issue deepad has had. People are beginning to have conversations in protected spaces as a result.

Burn out happens in all progressive communities. (and with ConComs.) Link dropping can be a way to avoid burn out. You can just find some one else talking about a topic and then point people there. It gets the point across and you don’t have to have the investment.

Shetterly has given his friends an Internet safeword so that people can tell him to back off. That way he won’t be on top of it in an unhealthy way.

You, as an individual, need to be responsible for yourself. Learn when to back off and help your friends by telling them when you are afraid they are going to burn out. Make sure you have people at your back so that it is less stressful and you don’t have to do all the heavy lifting. Being angry in chat with a safe group is a good way of being safe.

Documenting things can be difficult. How do you document issues that can be contentious. Neutrality is hard. How you document can effect the community that you’re documenting. (No one looks at SF Feminist wiki except Kathryn Kramer.) It can be a challenge. No solution for how to deal with that other than figuring out as you go.

Being the lone voice in the wilderness can be challenging. sometimes, you just need to take a break. But sometimes you can’t take a break because of your job. Then you need a small break, flip out in a corner and then go back. Be aware of the costs. Know stuff that has already happened, talked to survivors. Figure out coping strategies. A good strategy is to bring in a posse but don’t lead them on about why you are inviting them. Warn your posse about the situation, explain that you are swarming and explain to the organizers that you need diversity which is why you are bringing people.

The lurkers will support you.

Understand that you are in it for the long haul when you are the only voice. Don’t think short term.

People get attacked for bringing in people to back them up. Bringing in a posse is different. What you’re just doing is bringing in other people who can provide their own perspectives and to see if the person really had a point or if you are wrong.

One ass hole theory of systems means that you need at least one ass holes so that you can direct shit in the way it needs to go. The point of the ass hole can be to show people what not to do. Deployment of where you put your ass holes can be important. Not at the top as it all reins down.

Suck it and deal with it ARE valid responses. (Course people don’t need to tell you to suck it because the universe will tell you to suck it all on its own.) It is better to have a discussion on why a person needs to suck it.

Having allies who disagree is good because you’re not all minions.

Fear is good.

Lots of articles about this drama in a book sold in the Dealer’s room.

Digital Colonialism. Some guest PoCs and women can be a form of colonialism as they are just co-opted and used. That was an argument in a fail. People were not referred to. They were not informed that this was coming when the blog post was made. They would not stop when told they were being offensive.

Moderate your comments can avoid fail. If Elizbaeth Bear had done that, none of this would have happened.

From the keyword vault…

May 6th, 2009

Sometimes, we get some interesting keyword searches on out blog that look like people need answers that we haven’t answered.  In that spirit, I’m going to address some of those.

what rating did the fans give the twilight movie and why

Ratings can best be found on Yahoo!Movies and on IMDB. Yahoo!Movies fans really liked the movie more than IMDB users. If there was a large amount of wank about the movie being awful, it never hit the radar of the people contributing to our Twilight article.

nicole p. and bonnaroo / nicole p. 104.5 / 104.5 bonnaroo contest

Looking for info on Nicole P?  And why she’s been getting votes in that contest?  That’s because we’ve been heavily plugging it in several places, including Fan History’s main page.   Go vote please.  We would really love for her to be able to go so she could report on music fandom for Fan History. :D

star trek fan total members

How many members are there  in the Star Trek fandom?  I can’t really answer that easily.   There are at least 5,500 fans on LiveJournal.  We can guess that there are over 3,000 on FanFiction.Net for Star Trek in its various forms.  We know there are at least 45 on InsaneJournal.  We also know there at least 43 on JournalFen.   There are probably other places to get numbers but those are the ones we have on the wiki.

the most obscure fandom ever

What is the most obscure fandom ever?  That’s almost impossible to answer.  There are a huge number of small fandoms with very few fan communities.  Some of them could be really old, with very little that got translated online.  A good example probably includes Road to Morocco.  You also can have local sports team for sports that don’t have big international audiences.  An example of that includes the Storhamar Dragons based out of Norway.  Most people probably haven’t heard of them.   So in this case, we really need the term obscure better defined.

fanfiction net – meme’s stargate

I don’t have a clue.   It might appear in our Stargate article, but skimming it?  I’m not seeing an answer.  Some one please educate me!

trace the ip address who visited my community on orkut

I’ve got nothing.  If you can put images in your profile or community, I highly suggest getting a paid account and using LJToys.  I just don’t know orkut well enough to provide better information.

anime fan art history

A history of fanart can be found on Fan History’s fanart article.  It really needs more work, and only generally touches on anime so the anime article might be a better source.

can wanking be beneficial to growth

We talked about this a lot in this blog entry about generating positive metrics.  Wanking can help provide short term traffic spikes but don’t provide long term traffic stability unless you can do that again and again and again on a consistent basis.  Depending on your content?  That may not be desirable.

So ends this edition of “From the keyword vault…”  I kind of liked writing this so I may do another edition soon.

Differences between traffic sources from November to December

December 6th, 2008

It isn’t necessarily fair to compare these periods as they aren’t the same but I did it anyway. ;-)

Getting less daily traffic on average off JournalFen, TVTropes, DeviantArt, Wikia, FanPop, FanFiction.Net, StumbleUpon, TechCrunch. JournalFen can be explained with less wank. The rest are generally not our links and we’re not actively promoting over there to generate traffic.

Up up a lot for LiveJournal we’ve been promoting heavily on LiveJournal, Chickipedia because we added links there, and Twitter because we added more followers on our recentchanges account.

It will be interesting to see if these patterns hold for the rest of the month.

Fandom sized samples… how big?

December 6th, 2008

I’ve been bouncing off the walls for a bit now as we’re supposed to be getting a new bot for Fan History that is similar to Fan Fiction Stat Bot.  (It won’t probably be ready for another three weeks to a month.  I’m not in that much of a hurry and I’d rather the developer do it right.) The major difference is that this one will look at LiveJournal, its clones and the growth/size of fandom on them by monitoring the number of new posts and total comments to a selection of communities, which will then sorted by fandom so as to be able to compare the sizes of different fandom groups.

The sample community list is about 2,500 different communities.  It represents probably about 750 different fandoms.  The list isn’t 100% comprehensive because you can’t find every LiveJournal community based on a fandom and you can’t list every fandom.  And that’s what leaves me flummoxed.  How much time should be spent building a more comprehensive list of LiveJournal communities?  And InsaneJournal communities?

The thing with the sample is that I know going in that it won’t cover everything.  It isn’t possible.  It isn’t feasible.  The communities need to be manually vetted to make sure that while they might actually say list Twilight as a fandom, the community is actually about Twilight.  (And not say a community of pictures of sunsets.)   This list takes a lot of time to compile.  I’ve probably spent in the neighborhood of 24 hours compiling the list that was used for LiveJournal bot.  The updated list which will be used for this bot I’ve probably spent an equal amount of time compiling as I’ve needed to develop lists for InsaneJournal, JournalFen, Inksome, Scribbled, Blurty, DeadJournal and ivanovo.ru.  I could easily spend another week adding to the list beyond that, bringing the LiveJournal list to 5,000 communities and the InsaneJournal list to 1,000.  The other services have much less activity and fandom communities are much harder to find.  To a degree, it takes much more time to find those fandom communities for a much smaller list.  Two or three of those services are lucky to have five communities on them.

There are other issues. A lot of communities are long abandoned, not having been updated in years in some cases.  (This feels like it the case for smaller fandoms.)  They are never going to appear on any list of active fandoms as a result.  Including them feels necessary but also counterproductive because of the sparse amount of activity related to them.  Still, if we don’t have them in our list, how good of a sample do we really have?  And what is the cut off point?  I know for Fan History, we’ve posted to communities which haven’t had activity in more than a year… so new posts, new members, new comments are always possible.  Except probably in the case of role playing communities.  Those pretty much feel dead once the players have quit the game.

Another issue is sample size. How many communities is enough?  When do you stop the list?  Is it better to have fewer fandoms represented but to get a more communities represented for that fandom?  Or should we find one or two communities which we can have represent the whole of the fandom?  More fandoms or more communities per fandom?  I look at the Harry Potter and Twilight fandom lists and go ZOMG! Those huge fandoms only have about 20 communities in that sample!  They are HUGE! They should have at least 100!  Naruto, Inuyasha! Same deal! But we are still missing a whole slew of actors and television shows and anime and manga!

The dataset we are going to develop is going to be really, really interesting, and really, really useful.  It will help provide some data which can give a quantitative picture to exactly what is happening in parts of LiveJournal fandom.  It will help give a picture as to the size, comparitive size of various fandoms on LiveJournal.  You’ll also be able to examine the effect of certain events in the fandom to the size and amount of activity in fandom.  For instance, does a community being features on Fandom Wank lead to posting and membership spikes or a membership drop?  Does the release of canon cause an increase in posting volume, create a membership spike or both?  I’m really excited about getting this bot developed and up and operating.

In the meantime, you’ll see me over there busy working on adding to that list…

Fan History: August 2008: Traffic sources in the world of social networking

September 1st, 2008

It’s September 1. It feels like a good time to talk about traffic again and issues in getting traffic. Once again, I’m looking at Fan History’s traffic. This time, it is for August 2008.

I spend a lot of time on Twitter. I love twitter. I love the community. I love reading about the business end of running a startup, running a blog, running a website. Lots of time is spent talking about the whole traffic issue, linking to people’s blog posts about getting traffic. They tend to emphasis breaking traffic down into several areas and then talk up promoting your project in various areas. I’ve broken these categories down into the three following areas: Microblogging, social networking and social bookmarking. You’re supposed to interact on these spaces to help build up an audience who will be interested in what you have to say. I’ll explain how Fan History does that below each chart.

Have I mentioned I love Twitter? I do love Twitter. (And you can find me on Twitter at purplepopple.) I’ve set up various accounts on Twitter to aggregate Fan History’s recent changes page for the English version, and the Spanish version. I get some traffic from Twitter because I mention Fan History once a day. It would probably be more if I had more followers or if our recentchanges twitter account was promoted more. Unlike a number of other services, I am an active participant on twitter because I love the community and I learn a lot from it.

pownce is a newer service. I post to pownce from ping.fm but I’m not checking it or following it much. Not much of a surprise then that I’ve gotten one hit from them. It doesn’t necessarily feel like a service I want to invest my time in with the goal of generating traffic.

friendfeed is about community to a degree. I have my friendfeed set up with pretty much every service I use. I have probably five friends on it. If you follow me, I follow you. I check it once a day. If you’re following my friendfeed, you inevitably get slammed with links on some days when I’m busy promoting Fan History. I’m just not involved with it the community that much. I get more hits from there than I do from Pownce though.

I used to be a big fan of identi.ca. There appeared to be a great wiki community that looked like they were going to use it because the creator was a big name in the wiki community. People’s usage of identi.ca seems to have trailed off, with folks going back to twitter or trying out different services. I post there because of ping.fm and check it once a day. My followers list is pretty small. I’m not surprised at the lack of traffic from the service.

Social bookmarking is something I don’t really do. I’m kind of locked into the whole traditional bookmarking thing. I love mine. And I love sage, a Firefox plugin.

Still, it seems to be everyone’s goal to hit it big on digg as a way of generating a traffic spike, pushing down less then desirable mentions on search engines and making people more familiar with your site. So I and others affiliated with Fan History use digg to promote Fan History. We don’t really advertise digg submissions, don’t ask that people digg our submissions. Rather, we tend to go for bulk quantity submissions as we have over 475,000 articles on Fan History. When we’re actively doing bulk submissions on Digg for fandom oriented articles, we can get some digg traffic but those 10 to 20 hits take a lot of work. It sometimes doesn’t feel worth it.

FanPop is almost a social networking site for fandom. I used to promote Fan History on it a lot. I didn’t do that much in August because in July, digg traffic made it not seem worth the effort of doing that. Unlike digg, we couldn’t submit everything and the kitchen sink. We had to submit in very specific categories after finding the right spot. Still, it was a pleasant surpise of sorts to find that FanPop seemed to consistently give us three to eight hits a day. It is something worth looking at and going back to and adding more links to our content there.

delicious is a popular personal social bookmarking tool. It is a really popular social bookmarking tool inside fandom, where Fan History operates. There are probably over a thousand links to Fan History content on the site. It just doesn’t generate much traffic for us. A lot of times, it feels there really isn’t much of a community behind the site and bookmarks are trapped behind locked doors of people’s own links. We seem to get the occasional hit if we add a hundred or so links but on the whole, it really isn’t worth our time to use as a way to generate traffic.

stumbleupon. One day in August, we got 68 visits as a result of stumbleupon. A friend e-mailed me to tell me we made it after he stumbled across Fan History on stumble. We submit there but the stumble bump had very little connection to our attempts to use stumble to promote our content.

LiveJournal is one of the major homes to fandom on-line where people frequently refer to other content located elsewhere. As such, Fan History spends a lot of time using LiveJournal to promote our content. We’ve also found that using LiveJournal helps with our SEO and, unlike digg, we can get traffic from LiveJournal months after the initial plug. It’s fabulous. When I get together with other people, I tend to plug LiveJournal as an awesome source for traffic because of that. Our traffic looks pretty consistently high as a result of LiveJournal referrers. That happened with us plugging Fan History on LiveJournal a total of maybe only eight days out of the thirty-one. LiveJournal is also a place where, unlike many of the services mentioned in this post, I’m actively involved. I use LiveJournal. I post regularly on LiveJournal for my own private use. I engage others on the service. It’s like twitter for me. … Only as opposed to discussing the business end of what I do, I discuss the fan end.

InsaneJournal and JournalFen are LiveJournal clones. JournalFen has an established community of fan fiction and fandom people over 18. I’m not really involved there these days. It just isn’t my community. When we get traffic from JournalFen, it tends to be connected to Fandom Wank. As Fandom Wank can be a major reputation hurter, we’re not generally aiming to be mentioned there.

We use InsaneJournal like we use LiveJournal. It just isn’t used that much because it doesn’t have the depth of communities that LiveJournal has, doesn’t have the audience that LiveJournal has and doesn’t generate comparable traffic. Those things limit the usefulness of InsaneJournal.

MySpace generates a few hits for us here and there. Fan History mostly gets plugged on MySpace groups and in my profile. We’re not expecting it to be a major traffic source. It would be nice to get a bigger audience there but just not sure how to do it. And I’m not that interested in slogging through the service to become involved.

FaceBook is similar to MySpace. I promote it on my profile. It gets fed my comments from ping.fm that also go to twitter. The lack of a good search tool probably hurts our potential to get more traffic as a result. I use FaceBook to keep track of my friends, for occasional wiki things, for event finding. I’m not involved in the fan community located there.

We occasionally promote Fan History on bebo and orkut. Neither has been a particularly useful traffic driver and the fan community tends to fall outside my comfort level. So while that community is large, I don’t know it well enough to try to capitalize off of it.

LinkedIn gives us a few hits. Most of these are off my profile page. LinkedIn is another one of those sites I don’t always understand so trying to leverage it for more traffic can be a bit confusing. I’m not really involved in the community there either.

blogspot links are not ones that we create. We tend to get them after we plug Fan History on LiveJournal or after we e-mail a blogger and ask for a plug. blogspot doesn’t offer an easy way to contact people. That makes it hard to ask for plugs for Fan History. If it was, we’d probably spend a lot more time making such requests.

Conclusion
The services where I’m most active as a community participant are the ones where we get the most traffic. It is probably why LiveJournal will continue to be our primary tool to promote Fan History.

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