Posts Tagged ‘google’

Google security fail

April 6th, 2010

I use Google for e-mail and for analytics.  I also use other features but those are my two big ones.  For the past two days, I’ve had what I consider a pretty significant security issue and I’m not sure where it is originating from.  It is this:

What’s the major problem? I’m not epgeorge007@gmail.com. I have a different e-mail address I use. It doesn’t appear that epgeorge007@gmail.com and I are sharing a common Internet connection. I only log in to Google from my home Internet connection. When I googled to see who epgeorge007@gmail.com was, they weren’t located in the same state. I should not be logged in to their account. When I discovered this yesterday, I logged out. (And then I didn’t log in to another account. I didn’t need to use Google)

I should not be logged in to some one else’s account and I should not be able to view their Google Analytics information. Does anyone have any idea where this problem might be originating from?

GoogleAds continue to suck: You’re suspended again with no explanation and no recourse

January 28th, 2010

About a week ago, I talked to an industry person I really respected about the cash flow problems that Fan History has had and the stress that this has caused for me.  I’m not really good with the monetization aspect of running Fan History.  It is a problem and a chronic one.  He suggested trying Google Ads again because it works really well for his site.  (And the more prominent the ad placement, the more potential earnings for Fan History.)  We had tried them before on Fan History, only to be suspended right before we would have gotten our first check for $120 so I was leery.  Nevertheless, I conceded to myself that maybe it was time to try again. We did that on January 19.  Last night, our Google Ads were suspended.  Why?  You tell us based on the e-mail they sent me:

While going through our records recently, we found that your AdSense
account has posed a significant risk to our AdWords advertisers. Since
keeping your account in our publisher network may financially damage
our advertisers in the future, we’ve decided to disable your account.

Please understand that we consider this a necessary step to protect the
interests of both our advertisers and our other AdSense publishers. We
realize the inconvenience this may cause you, and we thank you in
advance for your understanding and cooperation.

If you have any questions about your account or the actions we’ve
taken, please do not reply to this email. You can find more information
by visiting
https://www.google.com/adsense/support/bin/answer.py?answer=57153&hl=en_US.

Sincerely,

The Google AdSense Team

I have no clue why Google removed our ads and why they yanked our $2.79 or so in revenue.  And I really have a hard time believing that this is for the best interest of their advertisers.  Why?  Because Google does things that are NOT in the best interest of their advertisers, like allowing people to have a domain up with a single page where Google hosts nothing but ads on it.  How is that traffic in anyway good for an advertiser?  What that sort of thing does is encourage bad practices amongst domain owners, encourages squatting on domain names, etc.

Google often sucks for the people that host their ads and advertisers; they cheat both out of lots of money.

Fan History referrer patterns revisited

June 12th, 2009

I was looking through old blog entries and saw Fan History referrer patterns with data from 2008. Since then, we’ve done some work to increase our traffic. We’ve succeeded in increasing the number of visitors to the wiki. We’ve got some new referrers. So time for a compare and contrast. Where have we improved from September 2008 to May 2009? These numbers are based on daily average visits from that referrer.

Sep-08    May-09    Increase
Google                   852          1,427.6    575.6
Yahoo                     144          187.7        43.7
LiveJournal             54            42.8        -11.2
NarutoFic.Org        16            0.0          -16.0
Wikipedia               14           9.2           -4.8
Ask                         11            5.2          -5.8
AnimeNewsNetwork    8        33.0         25.0
Wikia                       8              6.3         -1.7
AOL                          7            13.6          6.6
FanFiction.Net 6             9.1          3.1
MSN                       4               10.8        6.8
FanPop                   3              5.7           2.7
DeviantArt              3             0.6          -2.4
TVTropes                2             6.1            4.1
EncyclopediaDramatica    2    0.7          -1.3
Altavista                   2             1.5        -0.5
FaceBook                  1            2.4         1.4
hogwartsnet.ru    1               2.0            1.0
Total Daily               1,138    1,764.3    626.3

We’ve really increased our Google traffic. This was done by increasing our overall link diversity.  It is why we can take a hit with LiveJournal traffic, EncyclopediaDramatica traffic, DeviantART traffic and Wikipedia traffic and see an increase in our overall traffic.  What you aren’t seeing is our increase in traffic from places like Chickipedia, Twitter, answers.yahoo.com, wiki.fandomwank.com, ident.ca and jumptags.

Same advice as I had in October:If you’re running your own fansite or you have no money to promote your site, our suggestion is to spread yourself out some and focus on all aspects: Link building, quality content creation, quantity content creation, back end SEO optimization.

SEO question: Increased search traffic, fewer pages per visit?

February 27th, 2009

I have a question for those who do Search Engine Optimization! If you see your search engine traffic increase, do you tend to see a downturn in the average number of pages visited per visitor?

It looks like that way for Fan History. Is this normal?

Fan History LLC: Search Engine Optimization Internship

February 10th, 2009

Are you interested in gaining experience with a startup?  Would you like to work directly with the people who help shape the vision for the company?  Do you want to be able to make a measurable impact that you can show future employers?  Then considering working with Fan History LLC as a Search Engine Opimization Intern!

Company Background:

Fan History LLC is a developing entertainment company focused on our core products of an wiki and a fan fiction, fan art and fan vidding link site.  Fan History was founded two and a half years ago and incorporated 6 months ago by Laura Hale.  In that period, Fan History has grown from a wiki with a few hundred pages and 200 visitors a month to a become a wiki with over 600,000 pages and getting over 45,000 unique visitors a month.  We offer fans and entertainment related companies information that cannot be found elsewhere including a history of fan communities, the Internet’s largest directory of fans grouped by community, metrics data regarding the growth of fandom community and more.    To learn more about our company and our sites, visit http://www.fanhistory.com/wiki/Fanhistory.com:About .

Role Description and Responsibilities:

Fan History LLC is currently seeking candidates interested in a part-time Search Engine Optimization Internship.   This is an unpaid internship that will be virtual in nature (i.e., much of the Intern’s work will be done remotely with regular interactions with Fan History LLC’s team via e-mail, instant messenger, phone, and face-to-face depending on location.)  While the Internship is unpaid, the selected candidates will have an opportunity to be highly involved with the future direction of the company and will have an opportunity to attend events with Fan History LLC staff should any occur during the Intern’s tenure. Additionally, Fan History LLC is willing to work with the selected candidate for the purpose of obtaining academic credit related to this unique opportunity.

The primary responsibility of the Search Engine Optimization Intern will improving Fan History Wiki and FanworksFinder visibility in search engines such as Google, Yahoo, Ask, MSN and Cuil through link building.  As such, the Intern will be responsible for assignments and projects that include but are not limited to:

  • One way link creation
  • Content creation when breaking fandom news happens
  • Coordinate with other Fan History staff to promote selected content and keywords
  • Identify keywords driving traffic where content needs to be improved to get better placement for those keywords

Candidate Qualifications:
Fan History LLC is seeking some one with a strong mix of hard and soft-skills.  To that end, the ideal candidate will possess the following:

  • Interest in marketing, public relations or computer science
  • Interest in search engines and how to use them to promote websites
  • Effective written and verbal communication skills
  • Knowledge of Google’s Webmaster Tools and Google Analytics
  • Ability to work through ambiguous problems and drive to answers
  • Action-oriented mentality and strong drive for results
  • Knowledge of popular culture

This internship opportunity reports to the Founder and the CTO.  This is an immediate opportunity and we are seeking candidates that can work a minimum of 10-15 hours each week.  The weekly schedule is extremely flexible and can be developed around a candidate’s availability.  This internship requires a minimum of an 8-10 week commitment.

What’s In It For You:

The selected candidate will be afforded the opportunity to immerse themselves in a developmental, exciting, and entrepreneurial work environment.  Our business is about sharing information, teaching others about what is happening in the fan community and how this information can be applied to help them meet their goals.  That premise carries through our activities both internally and externally – we place just as much an emphasis on our growing our audience share, growing the amount of information that we have available as we do on developing our staff’s skill sets and knowledge base.

The Intern will be afforded extraordinary opportunities for mentoring via interaction with our team.  Our team has been involved in entertainment and fan communities for over ten years and has worked with entertainment companies to help them meet their goals.  The Intern will be personally mentored by Fan History’s Founder and will gain access to our professional network for future job networking opportunities.

What’s Next:
Are you ready to learn more than you think you can handle?  Interested in launching new projects and learning how to harness the power of search?  Then contact Laura Hale, Founder of Fan History ( laura@fanhistory.com ) for more information or to express interest.

This is a Part-time internship offered for a term of 2 to 4 Months.

Fan History is optimized for strange key phrases… like incest wiki.

January 9th, 2009

Over on twitter, I’ve been having some conversations with SEO non-fandom folks about key phrase optimization. The major question I’ve had is would a site rather be optimized to have one keyword as the top search result or ten keywords which appeared as number ten in the search results? The answer tends to be context specific. I’d love to get more opinions on that. What are your thoughts?

As a result of these conversations, I went looking through Fan History for phrases where we’d been optimized near the top. One phrase that I see about once a day is “incest wiki” which Fan History ranks number 2… right behind Wikipedia. (And ahead of Fandom Wank, and FanLore which are both fandom wikis. And ahead of wikitionary, simple English Wikipedia.) This phrase that we’re optimized for gets us an average of 4 visits a day. (Where the average visitor for that keyphrase visits 2.5 pages per visit.) It isn’t one we were looking for optimization wise but we’ll take it because there is a huge community of incest fan fiction fans around and there have been some large discussions about it that have had an impact on fandom.

The incest article could use a lot of work because it really isn’t as good as it could be. If you’re knowledgeable about the subject, please contribute.

Talking about my friend and encouraging her to use social media

November 19th, 2008

I love to chat with Angelia Sparrow (wiki). She’s a professional author who writes male/male romance novels and short stories. Her genre isn’t something I would read but our conversations teach me a lot about the publishing industry and the writing process.

Because I’m a friend (and occasionally a pushy and selfish one at that), I want to help her do well. The best way that I know how I can help her to succeed is to suggest ways to harness social media. She doesn’t always follow my advice because she’s got a family, another job, is trying to write and doesn’t necessarily have the time nor skills to play the social media game effectively in order to do it successfully. She’s also writing for a niche audience that isn’t ever likely to make it possible for her to become the next megahit author. (If she does, I’d be the first to congratulate her.)

But even with out that, there are a few small things you can do which don’t require much time and effort that can help increase your visibility and she’s done some of them. First, she has a website. It is angelsparrow.com. The site has contests involving her work. These help increase her audience of people who might want free stuff and rewards her fans. She also has a blog which she updates pretty regularly. It includes announcements, reviews, etc. It also has rss feeds. (Hard to believe but some blogs don’t have rss feeds even now.) This means that her new posts show up on rss search engines, on Google’s blog search and Google will regularly check her blog for updates.

She’s also engaged in social media elsewhere, including on LiveJournal, a blogging community which has a large and active fan fiction community. She’s been there forever. This presence means that she can leverage her fan fiction audience for her non-fan fiction writing. The audience she built through years and years of involvement can be used to help her sell books and her short stories. LiveJournal (wiki) loves to celebrate its fan writers gone professional. Or even its professional authors who just happen to use the service. Plugging your work, asking for help or advice for your work, all of these fit into the culture of LiveJournal’s communities. No one is going to question her doing that. In fact, they are more likely to celebrate it.

I’m totally in love with twitter so I’ve spent a lot of time badgering my friends to use the service, even as I tell them it isn’t for everyone. Thus, last night I was happy to find out that Angelia Sparrow is on twitter. If you’re a professional author (or even a fan fiction author), twitter can be a great way to connect with your audience, to maintain relationships, to reward fans, to let them know what is going on. Her twitter follow list is small and she could probably do with having a few more replies at people she follows so she utilizes twitter for its strengths more… but that she’s on there? Great. It is another way to connect with her fans. Still, if you’re not looking to spend much time on twitter, what she’s doing is probably the right way to go about it until she has a better reason and more time to engage.

Another thing she’s doing right (but could probably do better at) is she has a FaceBook page, is planning to create (or has created) a fan page for her work and created an event on FaceBook for her book release. These don’t require much time and effort to maintain if you’re talking about only a small potential pool of interested people. FaceBook has a lot of people on it and you can connect with your personal network of alumni, professional acquaintances, former classmates, friends and fans. Those people are just there. The site might not be intended as a way to create or utilize your fan base but FaceBook gives you the tools to do just that. So use them to do that and connect. And Angelia Sparrow does.

The one thing that I like when I give advice to Angelia Sparrow is that for her, she’s selling a product: A book or a short story in an anthology. This means that she doesn’t necessarily have to obsess over where her traffic is, how many visitors she gets a day, taking traffic from FaceBook or Twitter and trying to convert those visitors into visitors to her site. And then having to make that sell in terms of clicking on ads or buying services on her site. Analytics aren’t the be all and end all. The end game is using the right social media strategy to help her writing and sell her books. (Which can be bought from a couple of places like her publisher or Amazon.)

She does what she needs to do. She engages in a way that allows her to make good use of her limited time in her busy life. She connects to her core audience. So while she isn’t a major player in social media, isn’t cutting edge with how to utilize social media to generate sales, she’s still taking the right steps, steps that anyone who is in a similar position should be taking. I don’t think she probably is aware that she’s doing that because I think she’s just doing what feels right for her. Awesome.

AOL is closing their journals. How to save yours.

November 2nd, 2008

If you have a journal on AOL and you want to save it before AOL removes their blogging services, Google wants to help you.

Use the following steps:

1. Sign in with the Google Account you would like associated with your blog. If you don’t have a Google Account, make one.

2. Once you’ve signed in with your Google Account, you’ll be asked to enter your AOL Journal URL. Do so and click “continue.”

3. On the next page you’ll be asked to sign in with your AOL OpenID screen name or email address.

4. The import process will then begin and may take a few minutes to complete.

5. After your blog finishes importing, you’ll be asked to choose a title for your new Blogger blog as well as a new address.

6. Once you’ve chosen a new title and address, you can then select one of their blog templates.

7. Click “view your imported posts” to visit your blog at its new address.

[Source]

Fan History referrer patterns

October 2nd, 2008

I spend a lot of time looking at Google Analytics as we’re trying to figure out how to promote the wiki, what works and what doesn’t work, where problems are likely to occur, areas that we need to watch, etc. We’re also working on trying to improve our traffic. Fan History’s goal for the past six months has been to get over 1000 visitors a day. The following is the average number of daily visitors to Fan History in September as a  result of the specific referrer:

Average             Source
852              Google
144             Yahoo
54              LiveJournal
16              NarutoFic.Org
14              Wikipedia
11             Ask
8             AnimeNewsNetwork
8             Wikia
7             AOL
6             FanFiction.Net
4             MSN
3             FanPop
3             DeviantArt
2             TVTropes
2             EncyclopediaDramatica
2             Altavista
1             FaceBook
1             hogwartsnet.ru

What that basically means is that, Fan History can count on averaging 1,138 unique visitors a day based on the average amount of traffic we get from the sources. Assuming that we’ll continue to get them (none of the links on FanPop, ANN, Wikia, TVTropes, LiveJournal are deleted), then all we have to do is beat those averages, hope others (like you!) plug Fan History or promote the wiki ourselves to meet the traffic goal of 1,000 unique visitors a day. The next step is to average over 1,500 unique visitors a day based on existing traffic patterns. We’re really close but until that number gets to be over 1,300, it isn’t something that can very well be counted on.

Google and Yahoo are at the heart of our traffic and we’re rather pleased with that. It has taken a lot of work: Article linking, content building, article titles and our site name appearing in the page title.  A lot of what I read about in SEO tends to focus on content building or improving your back end to optimize it for a search engine.  The other view is to do article linking and article linking.  As we’ve focused on both, it has worked out well really well.

If you’re running your own fansite, our suggestion, based on what we’ve learned, is to spread yourself out some and focus on all aspects: Link building, quality content creation, back end SEO optimization.

Google’s digg like features probably not a fandom friendly feature

July 16th, 2008

The news about Google’s digg like features, as an active partipant in fandom, I’m not entirely happy with.   One of the things I know about fandom is that authors and fan artists like to have the perception of control of feedback regarding their work.  Many authors and artists get upset when comments for their stories and art are posted elsewhere, especially when those comments are negative.  Many authors get upset when their works are included and they have no control over it and there doesn’t seem to be a vehicle that controls for abuse.  Yes, people can submit on digg but digg isn’t a tool utilized by fandom much.  And the environment for digg is not a search tool that people go looking for fan fiction on.   Google on the other hand is very much a tool for fandom and finding material.

We’ll see how this turns out but I suspect some corners of fandom will be really angry about this.

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