Posts Tagged ‘csi’

Archive of Our Own vs. FanLib: Why they are not succeeding

June 29th, 2009

I love statistics.  I love analytics.  I love analyzing fandom based on those numbers.  The numbers can provide a framework for telling a story.  In the case of this set of numbers, a group was created back in May 2007 to try to bring greater fan control over certain parts of fandom in response to what they saw as the commercialism of fandom.  The specific commercialism of fandom in this case was FanLib.  There were people who hoped and believed that their new archive could end up being bigger than FanFiction.Net.   It hasn’t materialized and compared to what this group was fighting, they didn’t even measure up to FanLib in terms of the number of stories that FanLib had before it closed.  (Comparing their archive to FanLib seems apt.  Their supporters were comparing FanLib to FanFiction.Net.)    Let’s take a look at the numbers and how they stacked up…

Fandom   ? FanLib, # of stories   ? Date   ? Archive of Our Own, # of stories   ? Date   ?
15/Love 0 January 3, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
28 Days Later 1 January 29, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
4400 9 January 30, 2008 3 June 29, 2009
7th Heaven 3 February 2, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
8 Simple Rules 0 February 2, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Absolutely Fabulous 1 February 2, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Alf 0 February 9, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Alias 38 February 9, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Alias Smith and Jones 2 February 9, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Alien 3 January 29, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Angel 122 February 21, 2008 92 June 29, 2009
Battle of the Planets 25 December 13, 2007 3 June 29, 2009
Bleach 113 January 30, 2008 23 June 29, 2009
Brokeback Mountain 23 December 30, 2007 2 June 29, 2009
Buffy: The Vampire Slayer 234 January 2, 2008 244 June 29, 2009
Charmed 70 August 17, 2007 1 June 29, 2009
CSI 250 December 7, 2007 9 June 29, 2009
CSI: Miami 65 December 19, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
CSI: New York 38 December 19, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Disney’s Gargoyles 3 December 30, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Dragon Ball 4 January 7, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Dragon Ball Z 62 January 7, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
due South 0 June 29, 2007 265 June 29, 2009
Final Fantasy VII 17 December 30, 2007 3 June 29, 2009
Friends 71 August 17, 2007 1 June 29, 2009
Gilmore Girls 220 January 30, 2008 14 June 29, 2009
Grey’s Anatomy 27 December 18, 2007 36 June 29, 2009
Gunsmoke 0 August 17, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Harry Potter 1,740 May 3, 2008 236 June 29, 2009
House M.D. 72 January 30, 2008 203 June 29, 2009
Inuyasha 636 January 4, 2008 1 June 29, 2009
Kingdom Hearts 75 December 7, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Lois and Clark 32 December 28, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Lord of the Rings 130 December 8, 2007 55 June 29, 2009
Lost 49 August 17, 2007 52 June 29, 2009
My Chemical Romance 2 January 30, 2008 3 June 29, 2009
Naruto 1,843 December 18, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
NCIS 18 October 2, 2007 18 June 29, 2009
One Tree Hill 11 August 19, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Pirates of the Caribbean 231 January 2, 2008 27 June 29, 2009
Robin of Sherwood 0 January 7, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Sailor Moon 92 May 23, 2007 0 June 29, 2009
Scarecrow and Mrs. King 0 January 27, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
Smallville 84 January 11, 2008 107 June 29, 2009
Star Wars 330 December 8, 2007 20 June 29, 2009
Supernatural 220 December 13, 2007 241 June 29, 2009
Thunderbirds 240 July 24, 2008 0 June 29, 2009
X-Men 72 January 2, 2008 13 June 29, 2009
Zelda 11 December 15, 2007 0 June 29, 2009

Just how big is their lack of success? 1 Inuyasha story. 0 Naruto stories. 0 Sailor Moon stories.  0 CSI: Miami stories. 0 Thunderbirds stories.

Why didn’t they take off?  There are probably a lot of reasons.  The biggest is probably because the group that founded this archive were never FanFiction.Net type users to begin with.  (Thus, FanLib was never intended for them.)  Switching from blogging software to archiving software was probably a cultural struggle that they weren’t motivated to do because the new archive didn’t have readers and would have distanced them from existing power structures in fandom that they value.  (FanFiction.Net  certainly has a power structure, popular people, ways to propell your status on the site and in fandom.  It just is probably less obvious to outsiders.)  At the same time, the creators failed to market the site.  There was no massive outreach to FanFiction.Net users, to former FanLibbers, to Quizilla users, to LiveJournal users, to AdultFanFiction.Net users. (And when they do market it, it looks like they are trying to use wank to generate traffic.  Just look at their warnings we has! announcement on metafandom.)  As a result, their major pool of authors was severely limited.  The last reason why it looks like they fail to succeed as much as FanLib is they don’t appear to believe in their own product.  People aren’t doing fake LJ cuts to it.  They aren’t delicious bookmarking it on any scale.  They just don’t appear to want to make the time commitment to make it THE next FanFiction.Net.

CSI: The Movie?

April 21st, 2009

The CSI fangirl in me is all excited by this:

Source

“CSI fans take heart: A feature-length movie is in the cards, and it’s definitely going to involve Gil Grissom, according to William Petersen.

“Yes, there will be a movie,” Petersen told Britain’s Radio Times. Although he is sure fans might be “a little trepidatious,” Petersen promises the move to the big screen will not be done haphazardly.

“Usually people leave it till a series has finished —they did that with The X-Files and Sex and the City,” Petersen said. “But it’s about finding the right story, there has got to be a real reason to do it.”

One of those real reasons? Grissom won’t be around forever. “You don’t just do it because you want to make money — you do it because there’s a story that can’t be told on TV and needs to be told from CSI’s perspective and the audience wants it,” Petersen said. “And we can’t wait for CSI to end or Grissom will be about 90.”

Petersen bowed out of the hit CBS drama after eight years earlier this season, handing over the reins to Laurence Fishburne’s Raymond Langston. He had previously said his character’s open-ended departure preserved the chance of a film.”

If we’re getting it, I want it to be the continuing adventures of Grissom/Sara so I can watch more of Jorja Fox on the screen.  If she’s not involved or it doesn’t continue that arc while including Grissom…  No wait.  I know my fandom.  No matter which way that goes down, people will have massive hate on.  I’m not certain I see this as a good idea as a result because I’m not certain the audience will turn out for a movie if it doesn’t fit their ideal.  Money matters and shelling out with out the reward of your favorite characters or ships?  I can’t see it happening.

The problems of writing personal histories in a wiki…

April 21st, 2009

On Thursday morning, a friend of Fan History’s and one of our admins pointed me at another post about the issues with FanLore.  We were really interested in this post because it dealt with similar yet different issues than the ones brought up by nextian.  Like that post, we’ve gone through and commented in terms of how we’ve handled similar criticism, how we handle situations like the one mentioned in terms of FanLore, what advice we have, etc.  We haven’t addressed the whole post and the comments because of length.  (And because we got a bit distracted by other things going on.)  We hope to get back to it.

A lot of non-fic fandom is languishing at Fanlore. Gamer fandom, in particular, I notice, ‘cos I’ve been part of that for (eeep!) more than thirty years.

This is a similar problem that Fan History has faced.  And it isn’t just non-fic fandoms.  It is fandoms where there is a community outside of and removed from the fan fiction community.  This was an area we were criticized for about two years.  We were too fan fiction-centric.  We weren’t multifannish enough.  We didn’t encourage the telling of fandom history outside of the fan fiction community.  And those criticisms were entirely valid back then. But now?  We’ve got a whole lot of fan fiction content but we’re a lot less fan fiction-centric in terms of our article scope.  Removing that has been a goal of ours and on our to-do list for a long time. It’s there as a reminder that when we see a timeline for a fandom that says “this fan fiction community,” we change it to “this fan community” or “this fandom.”  We’ve made this a priority.

That doesn’t even begin to get into the issue of media fandom vs. anime and manga fandom vs. actor fandom vs. music fandoms vs. video game fandoms.  In this respect, I think Fan History was fortunate because we had anime and video game fandoms represented early thanks to Jae, one of our earliest contributors.  She had a lot of experience in the Digimon and Final Fantasy communities, and created a number of articles about them.  We are also fortunate to a degree as my own interests were pretty pan-fannish.  I had connections to the anime and  music fandoms because of my relationships with the folks at RockFic, the guy who runs FanWorks.Org, and the people who run MediaMiner.Org.

FanLore isn’t as fortunate in that regards.  Their traditions, their interests have always been focused on media fandom and science fiction.  They don’t really have one or two core people who come from fannish experiences outside their own who, organizationally, are equal to other members of that community.  It is easy to have that problem because you tend to go with what you know, hang out with like-minded people, and stay in your comfort zone.

If you want those other fan communities represented, you have give those fans an investment in it.  You bypass the traditional rules.  You find a BNF in one of those fandoms, offer them admin status, and encourage them to promote the project in their own community.  We did this with the Kim Possible fandom.  We made one their own a fandom administrator, talked to the guy on a regular basis and encouraged him to reach out to his community.  And, to a certain degree, it worked.  If we hadn’t done that outeach, we would not have seen the edits to the Kim Possible section that we have had.  None of our core contributors have ever really been in the Harry Potter or Rescue Rangers fandoms to any large degree.  We reached out on mailing lists, LiveJournal groups, fansites, and fan fiction archives.  We asked for their help.  These folks responded.  Why?  We built a framework which made it easy to contribute.  In most cases, we left them alone to make edits as they needed to so long as they didn’t violate the rules.  They responded more when those articles became useful for them in terms of regularly visiting and linking because people couldn’t get that content elsewhere.

But I’m not sure what to do with the wiki. It’s… big. And mostly empty, in the areas of fandom that are most dear to me. And I’m not a historian; I don’t remember the details, the names & dates, of the fannish events & memes that I grew to love; I remember vague overview of concepts, and a few bright points of detail, which make for lousy wiki entries. I would like to start entries and allow others to fix them, but the few I tried that with, haven’t worked. I don’t think there’s anyone active at Fanlore who comes from “my branch(es)” of fandom.

The thing is, you don’t NEED to be a historian to be able to write the history of a fan community.  You don’t need all the dates.   You can write a good history based on general feel.  People can come in later and improve it with citations.  Just describe what you see going on with your gut feeling and explain that as well as you can.  Describe the community and how it operates.  Heck, a lot of this is not citable; how can you cite things like trends in, say, the LiveJournal community?  There is no way to cite, without doing a lot of research and without having access to primary source documents.

What we hope will happen is that by someone putting what they feel in there, what they intrinsically understand as a community history or how the community functions, someone else will be inspired by seeing that to do the additional research.  Or that someone else will disagree with that and edit it to include their own perspective, and the two different perspectives that can’t really be sourced can be merged.  Or that someone will know some good citations to support what is written.

The models for doing this have to be different because you aren’t writing a traditional history.  This is not the same as writing a history of the US Civil War.  Much of this involves writing ethnographic-style history.  The methodologies are different than other forms of documenting history.  The practices are different.  Both types of history are different from writing meta.

This all has an impact on how people contribute.  Administrators need to keep that in mind. The admin team needs to understand the fundamental methodologies involved in writing history.  At Fan History, our admins have spent a lot of time getting a crash course on exactly this.   There have been discussions on our mailing list about the methodologies of writing women’s histories, and how historians use oral histories in their research.  We’ve talked about multiple perspectives and issues of bias in the telling of fandom history.  We’ve discussed research done in fandom by academics like Henry Jenkins and Camille Bacon-Smith, identified areas of bias and how we can learn from that.  We’ve discussed primary sources, secondary sources, historian bias, reporter bias, the role of collaboration in history writing, quantitative versus qualitative approaches and merging the two approaches to get a cohesive history.  The more familiar the admin staff is with these issues, the better they are at analyzing, guiding and teaching others in terms of writing those histories in fandoms where those admins are not involved.

Knowing all this methodology also helps admins because they can learn when to leave alone historical information where someone doesn’t know the exact dates and might be a little off but are well-intentioned, and when they should step in to correct things that are obviously wrong or intentionally inflammatory.  For example, they can learn to correct when some one thinks they recall something about LiveJournal before LiveJournal actually existed or says something like: “There was never a good mpreg story published in the CSI fandom”.  The grounding in methodology helps to identify when you don’t need sources and when you do.

We’ve done an excellent job in  a few sections without many sources.  http://www.fanhistory.com/wiki/CSI does that; no citations but tells history with charity work, with fan fiction archives like FanLib, and with how the LiveJournal community works.  We’ve also done a fairly good job with that on the mpreg article.  http://www.fanhistory.com/wiki/Mpreg talks about how mpreg is received in particular fan communities.  No citations.  Are we going to remove them?  No.  If there are issues, we can use the talk page to discuss that.  If people have problems with that, they can toss in {{fact}} or {{POV}}.

And if you still have issues where you can’t integrate that information, you do outreach.

I’m a sci-fi fan; I love reading, not watching, my sci-fi input. I love conventions, even though I’ve gone to very very few in the last decade. (So all of my con-based fanlore is decades old. Sigh.) And I want to fill in the blanks for the fandoms I love, but I can’t even get a grip on where and how to start.

I can totally understand that.   When I started writing the history of fandom, I had similar problems…  though more so the case of I had a lot of historical information that I could cite but all that information was really absent context. I didn’t know how to integrate it in to a historical context where these bits and pieces made sense.  I had lists of Doctor Who, Blake’s 7, Star Trek, and Starsky and Hutch fanzines from the 1980s, but no information about how of those zines were received by the readers, what were common tropes, who was writing them, or who the audience was.  How the heck do you put that information into an article about the fandom those zines come from and have it fit in any sort of meaningful way?  A lot of the culture probably changed when things went online.  There might not have been a continuity in that culture when it went online, so totally different cultural practices were created.   And sometimes, you really are left wondering who will care about that Blake’s 7 femslash zine that was written in 1992 other than someone into trivia.  Also, a lot of this might be duplicate historical research that someone already put out in a fanzine list done in 1995 and if only you had access… It is just a mess.

But at least that information is easy to cite or know.  It might be hard to get a grip on when you’re trying to put it into a big picture and you don’t have a starting place.  The personal, well, I can totally understand that in a different context.   I don’t know when some things happened.  I know I was on staff at FanFiction.Net.  I know I wrote the site’s first Terms of Service.  I know I got into a big fight with Steven Savage over policies.  I don’t know the exact dates.  I don’t have copies of the original text.  I know I founded the b5teens.  I know I got into a giant kerfluffle with some people on another mailing list when I was 16.  Many of the others involved in the group with me back then have left fandom.  I don’t know the dates. I don’t have the texts.  I’m sure as heck hoping that the fan fiction I wrote has disappeared.  Even assuming I knew some of that information, it was still weird to find a starting point.  What seems really big and important to you when you’re in the thick of it is difficult to put into any sort of proper historical context.

How can you make your own history as unbiased as possible?  People do a lot of stupid things -myself included - and really, who wants to deliberately make themselves look bad?   After dealing with that, how do you cite information when the source is yourself?  Or when you’re documenting history that includes your own involvement?  What event do you start with?  Do you start on the stuff you’re most passionate about, or the place where you can most easily slot your history in? Do you write the history where you can most easily put information into context, or the history where you can best cite your sources?

And you know, there are no easy answers to where to start when you’re talking about random bits of fandom historical knowledge or your own history. The best suggestion, in personal terms, is to think of your own goals for involvement for writing a history.  Is there a particular fandom where you have a lot of experience and knowledge but no one has really written up a history yet?  Is there an event that you think matters where you feel like you have a unique perspective?  Has someone written information that can provide a framework for your own history?

Those might be a places to start if you’re stumped. Try to write biographies or histories of the key players that you know.  Timeline specific events in the context of the convention, mailing list, fanzine, IRC chat room, fanclub, social network or kerfluffle.  Create an outline. This information doesn’t need to be ready for “prime time.”  You’re not writing an academic text.  You’re providing information from within the fan community to help members of the fan community and those on the outside better understand it.  Tenure isn’t at risk.  (Though if you’re writing biased material with the intent of making yourself and your friends look better, your reputation in the fan community might be at risk.)   In the early stages, the information that you’re writing or collecting doesn’t even necessarily need to go on the main article about a fandom.  You can keep it on subpages until you understand all the moving pieces and how they fit into the larger fandom picture.  Then, later, you can integrate it into the main article or just create a “see also” in the main article.

If that doesn’t work for you, there are other places to start.  Find the talk page for an article relevant to the history you want to tell.  Introduce yourself on the talk page, talk about your experiences, cite sources where some of that information can be verified and ask the contributors to the article to integrate that information into the article.  Follow up when people ask questions or explanations.   Using talk pages this way can be helpful in terms of learning the feel of a wiki community and how people expect you to contribute.  They can also help you find someone who is more comfortable in terms of finding a starting place, who can help you focus what you want to do.  Starting on talking pages can also be similar to drafting on subpages like I mentioned above: there is less pressure because things aren’t on the main article and you don’t need to make a judgement call on the merits of what you’re contributing.  Others can do that by chosing to integrate your knowledge and experience into the article.

Follow up: Most human revised articles on Fan History

April 9th, 2009

The last post was heavy in terms of bot revised edits on Fan History. It is that way because our data collection bots update every day and some have been active since September 2008. This is the last of non-bot, human edited entries on Fan History.

The following data is cached, and was last updated 18:45, 9 April 2009.

Showing below up to 500 results starting with #1.

View (previous 500) (next 500) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)

  1. Harry Potter ?(291 revisions)
  2. Draco/Hermione ?(242 revisions)
  3. Bandfic ?(228 revisions)
  4. Beauty and the Beast ?(221 revisions)
  5. Digimon ?(219 revisions)
  6. Supernatural ?(219 revisions)
  7. CSI ?(214 revisions)
  8. Rescue Rangers ?(209 revisions)
  9. Doctor Who ?(200 revisions)
  10. X-Files ?(195 revisions)
  11. Main Page ?(190 revisions)
  12. Cassandra Claire ?(186 revisions)
  13. Organization for Transformative Works ?(184 revisions)
  14. Slash ?(157 revisions)
  15. Doctor Who fanzines ?(138 revisions)
  16. Star Trek ?(135 revisions)
  17. Bleach ?(132 revisions)
  18. Russell Crowe ?(122 revisions)
  19. Star Trek fanzines ?(121 revisions)
  20. AdultFanFiction.Net ?(119 revisions)
  21. Star Wars ?(118 revisions)
  22. Sailor Moon ?(118 revisions)
  23. The Police ?(115 revisions)
  24. Susan M. Garrett ?(114 revisions)
  25. Daiken ?(114 revisions)
  26. Lord of the Rings ?(113 revisions)
  27. LiveJournal ?(112 revisions)
  28. Mortal Instruments ?(107 revisions)
  29. Roswell ?(106 revisions)
  30. FanFiction.Net ?(106 revisions)
  31. Zelda ?(105 revisions)
  32. Duran Duran ?(103 revisions)
  33. The Forever Knight Fan Fiction Awards ?(101 revisions)
  34. Naruto ?(100 revisions)
  35. Msscribe ?(99 revisions)
  36. Avatar: The Last Airbender ?(97 revisions)
  37. Mlina ?(95 revisions)
  38. Lucia de’Medici ?(95 revisions)
  39. Warcraft ?(95 revisions)
  40. Draco/Ginny ?(95 revisions)
  41. Final Fantasy VII ?(94 revisions)
  42. Current events ?(91 revisions)
  43. Grissom/Sara ?(89 revisions)
  44. Canadian Idol ?(89 revisions)
  45. Fan fiction archives ?(89 revisions)
  46. Gundam Wing ?(87 revisions)
  47. Plagiarism ?(86 revisions)
  48. Race Fail 2009 ?(86 revisions)
  49. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer ?(86 revisions)
  50. Xena: Warrior Princess ?(85 revisions)
  51. Twilight ?(85 revisions)
  52. My Chemical Romance ?(83 revisions)
  53. X-men ?(82 revisions)
  54. Thunderbirds ?(79 revisions)
  55. Hey Arnold! ?(78 revisions)
  56. Tikatu ?(78 revisions)

Most revised articles on Fan History

April 9th, 2009

We discovered today that Special:MostRevisions won’t load 95% of the time because it just takes too long to load. That’s what happens with over a million and a half edits. Before we cache it and it no longer updates, I thought I would present to you that list of the top 50 most edited articles. A lot of these are bot updated daily so counting them seems a bit iffy… but that’s neither here nor there. now for the list:

Pages with the most revisions

From Fan History Wiki

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Showing below up to 50 results starting with #1.

  1. Harry Potter ?(291 revisions)
  2. Draco/Hermione ?(242 revisions)
  3. Zoey101 (LiveJournal) size/table ?(229 revisions)
  4. Bandfic ?(228 revisions)
  5. Beauty and the Beast ?(221 revisions)
  6. Supernatural ?(219 revisions)
  7. Digimon ?(219 revisions)
  8. CSI ?(214 revisions)
  9. Rescue Rangers ?(209 revisions)
  10. Harry Potter fan fiction community size/table ?(205 revisions)
  11. NCIS fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  12. Naruto fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  13. Avatar: Last Airbender fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  14. Bleach fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  15. Twilight fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  16. Death Note fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  17. House MD fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  18. Inuyasha fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  19. Supernatural fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  20. Fandom tracking/table ?(202 revisions)
  21. Bones fan fiction community size/table ?(202 revisions)
  22. CSI fan fiction community size/table ?(202 revisions)
  23. Doctor Who fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  24. D.Gray-Man fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  25. Wrestling fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  26. Pokemon fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  27. Heroes fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  28. Maximum Ride fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  29. CSI: New York fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  30. Prince of Tennis fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  31. Shugo Chara! fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  32. Doctor Who ?(200 revisions)
  33. Stargate: SG-1 fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  34. Total Drama Island fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  35. Vampire Knights fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  36. One Piece fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  37. Chronicles of Narnia fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  38. Bis(s) fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  39. Hannah Montana fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  40. Katekyo Hitman Reborn! fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  41. South Park fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  42. Stargate: Atlantis fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  43. Code Geass fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  44. Criminal Minds fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  45. Yu-Gi-Oh fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  46. One Tree Hill fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  47. Ouran High School Host Club fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  48. Sailor Moon fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  49. Fullmetal Alchemist fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  50. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)

FanFiction.Net downtime leads to more traffic for Fan History

April 7th, 2009

Yesterday, FanFiction.Net was down for a while. As a reader, as mentioned here, I was kind of annoyed because I wanted to read fan fiction.

This afternoon, I looked at Google Analytics for the first time in a couple of days. (We had downtime so I hadn’t wanted to see the big traffic drop off as a result. It can be depressing.) Surprisingly, our traffic was pretty high. It probably was our fifth heaviest traffic day. I wondered why. The chart below really explains it. To give this chart some perspective? The previous day we had 22 visits from FanFiction.Net related keyword searches. Other high traffic days include January 5, 2008 (145 visits), February 24, 2009 (131 visits), and February 23, 2009 (110 visits). No other days had more than 100 visits as a result of this keyword. So FanFiction.Net’s downtime led to increased traffic for Fan History.

Keyword Visits Pages/Visit Avg. Time on Site
fanfiction.net 33 2.8 123.9
fanfiction.net down 27 3.3 274.7
fanfiction net 20 1.4 34.8
fanfiction.net down? 12 2.4 307.1
fanfiction.net is down 6 2.7 366.0
fanfiction.net downtime 3 1.3 27.7
fanfiction net down 2 4.0 696.0
fanfiction.net is down! 2 2.0 454.5
fanfiction.net server down 2 2.0 96.0
www.fanfiction.net 2 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net”" 1 7.0 129.0
to love and be loved”" fanfiction.net csi 1 1.0 0.0
adultfanfiction.net harry ¨potter 1 1.0 0.0
down fanfiction.net 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction net down? 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction net draco hermione 1 2.0 28.0
fanfiction net problems 1 4.0 528.0
fanfiction net story 1 7.0 129.0
fanfiction.net 503 server not found 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net blind sight 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net cima1305 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net d.gray-man 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net down ? 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net down april 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net down april 2009 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net down april 6 2009 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net down april 6, 2008 1 6.0 93.0
fanfiction.net down? 2009 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net hisotry 1 2.0 123.0
fanfiction.net house md community cameron house 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net is down april 6, 2009 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net issues 1 7.0 300.0
fanfiction.net not working 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net not working 503 service 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net not working april 6 1 5.0 243.0
fanfiction.net server error 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net server problem 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net servers down? 1 4.0 723.0
fanfiction.net website is down 1 1.0 0.0
fanfiction.net wiki 1 1.0 0.0
high school musical community fanfiction net 1 1.0 0.0
http://www.fanfiction.net/ 1 5.0 404.0
luke skywalker and darth vader community fanfiction net 1 4.0 57.0
most reviewed fanfictions on fanfiction.net 1 2.0 76.0
related:www.fanfiction.net/tv/gilmore_girls/ 1 6.0 1110.0
un pari dangereux – elsar pour fanfiction.net 1 2.0 17.0
when was fanfiction.net founded 1 1.0 0.0
why is fanfiction.net down 1 1.0 0.0
why isn’t fanfiction.net working? 1 1.0 0.0
www fanfiction net charm3power . com 1 1.0 0.0
yu yu hakusho fanfiction net 1 1.0 0.0
Total/Average 150 2.2 124.3

Trying to give CSI a chance in a post Grissom era…

January 23rd, 2009

I was a huge Sara fan and I’ve kind of been struggling since then to keep my interest in the show. I liked Grissom as my third favorite character behind Catherine. So this has been a real blow. I’m really trying to give it a chance because nothing else has yet so spark for me in terms of liking it more and wanting a new obsession.

Back when the show first started, Sara was the character that producers said was a vehicle for fans to help understand what was going on. “Yay! This is so cool!” and being an outsider to some of the early character related drama going on, giving her/our perspective on how things should be handled. (Warrick should be fired. He was gambling when he should have been at a scene.)

Ray Langston feels like that. Only stepping back and taking us back to review the process that these guys that we love actually do. Here is how we fingerprint. Here is how we interact with the people. See, this is why we don’t get involved because it comes back to hurt us. Blah. I just. I don’t want that sort of character. Or maybe I’d take it better if the character who I perceived as being a vehicle for our interaction as fans was more enthusiastic, more knowledge and heck, to a certain degree, more attractive to me on a personal level.

The whole economic situation is really depressing in life outside watching this show. Lots of people are dealing with family stress as a result of fall out. It is cold and flu season. The weather is crappy. I know CSI is a crime show and we are watching people dealing with crime, being victims of crime and not always happy endings in terms of dealing with the bad guy but Ray Langston just feels like a downer of a character. I want almost a happier character rather than continuing down a road that’s sad and depressing. We’ve had so much of that for the past season and a half. As a viewer, I’m not sure how much I can take before I just tune out because I don’t have the fundamental pieces that were why I started regularly tuning in in the first place, if I don’t have those character where I have that established relationship with.

So while I’m willing to give it a chance, I’m not sure how long that chance will last. And if the fan fiction community that has kept me watching since Sara departed and Grissom was rumored to be leaving stop writing new stories? I’m really gone.

Most popular fandoms on Fan History this year so far!

January 3rd, 2009

Most popular fandom articles so far this year! What is starting off hot on Fan History in 2009?

January 1

  1. Thundercats
  2. Dexter
  3. Digimon
  4. Naruto
  5. Thunderbirds
  6. Dragon Ball Z
  7. Pride and Prejudice
  8. Yu-Gi-Oh
  9. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer
  10. Ouran High School Host Club

January 2

  1. Thundercats
  2. Digimon
  3. Naruto
  4. City of Bones/Mortal Instruments
  5. Thunderbirds
  6. Prison Break
  7. Beauty and the Beast
  8. CSI
  9. Pride and Prejudice
  10. Sailor Moon

Keyword peaks for fandoms and fansites on Fan History in 2008

December 31st, 2008

The following are when interest, based on keyword (not keyphrase), spiked in 2008 on Fan History according to Google Analytics…

January 5

January 11

January 13

January 14

January 27

February 22

February 27

March 2

March 8

March 13

March 18

April 17

April 29

May 22

May 27

June 10

June 13

July 6

July 20

July 24

July 29

August 3

August 11

August 12

August 13

August 21

August 22

August 23

September 12

September 27

September 29

October 6

October 15

October 16

October 17

October 20

October 21

October 31

November 6

November 9

November 9

November 11

November 22

November 23

November 28

December 1

December 6

December 9

December 11

December 28

December 29

Survivor has a winner!

December 14th, 2008

And the winner is Bob! Woe! I’ve been a Sugar fan since early in the season so I was disappointed that she didn’t get a single vote. If she had played it as “Look, I played the best game. This is a game.” she might have had a shot. She didn’t and the final tribal council was full of awesome because of that. Seriously? This is the best season in years and years. There were more twists, more drama than ever before. Just awesome. So despite the person I wanted to win NOT winning, it was a great ride.

And Survivor and Amazing Race both having come to an end, with Gil Grissom officially leaving CSI in the next episode… I’m not certain what will happen with my television watching for a while. Bah!

FanFiction.Net vs. LiveJournal community size

December 6th, 2008

The bot isn’t finished running yet… but while still compiling, I thought it was worth looking at some of these fandoms and how the size of LJ fandom is beginning to look, how big fandoms look versus eachother and versus FanFiction.Net community size…

This isn’t yet complete as the bot continues to run. Some fandoms may not have had their communities looked at because they didn’t cross over much with communities the bot has already looked at. There might be some naming issues which still need to be resolved. (Which were corrected when I spotted a few of them.) Some fandoms just didn’t have communities about them in the sample community list. Some categories actually contracted as we did admin work such as deleting duplicate articles and handled Article Deletion Requests… so any fandom which didn’t have over 50 new articles for categories with over 650 articles in them were excluded.

But overall, this table begins to paint an interesting picture as to the biggest fandoms on LiveJournal. FanFiction.Net column is total articles from FanFiction.Net. LiveJournal column is FanFiction.Net + LiveJournal articles (or new total of articles in the category). Difference column equals total number of members from LiveJournal.

Twitter, fandom and me

November 25th, 2008

Before I begin this, I need to define what I mean by fandom because fandom and entertainment fans (consumers of popular culture) can often look alike but they frequently don’t act the same.

Fandom, Members of fandom:

  • Group that shares a common interest in a media product such as Harry Potter, Twilight, Star Wars, Pokemon, Starcraft, etc.
  • Are actively engaged with the product and other fans by having discussions, creating and commenting on other people’s fan fiction (art, vids, icons, costumes, etc.), attending/organizing conventions, organizing campaigns to save/improve the media product, etc.
  • Form relationships based on shared interest where the relationships with other fans are central to their activities.

Entertainment fans, consumers of popular culture:

  • Do not have a group identity as fans of a show.
  • Are passively engaged with the product by having conversations, commenting on blogs, blogging about the show, consuming the product.
  • Relationships are not at the heart of and purpose of their interactions with others who share their enjoyment of a media product.

Put simpler: Fandom is about relationships.  Entertainment fans, not so much.

Which brings me to Twitter and my sometimes confusing relationship with it as a fan.  And after a number of conversations with other fans, this is a problem that a number of other fandom people on the outside looking in suffer with.  What use is twitter for fans?  What use is Twitter for me as a fan?

I come from fandom out of mailing lists and LiveJournal where relationships are key.  If there is an author I love, I would try to form a relationship of sorts with them.  I might ask to be there beta reader.  I might e-mail or IM them with questions about their stories or what else they are working on.  If they were writing to slowly, I might leave lots and lots of feedback or beg them to WR1T3 M0R3!  I might friend them on LiveJournal to keep up with what is going on with them.  If I get to have a relationship with them, then my enjoyment of the thing for which we share an interest is enhanced.  I have another person to squee with over new episodes, and insure that stories I love will be continued, have some one to unite with against other people in the community I don’t like.  I might also have some one who could attend a convention with me or share a hotel at a convention with me which could make attending that convention cheaper.  I’ve got a friend.  Well.  Sort of.  Once our interests change or if I do something which upsets the person’s ability to enjoy the community or the material, I don’t have a friend any more.  But while we’re both in that relationship, we’re great and we communicate a lot.

If I want to get “ahead” in fandom, if I want to have greater influence, I form relationships with people who are in the position to help me.  I can make friends with fan fiction archivists, with authors who have huge amounts of readers, with content producers, etc.  And if I want to be able to leverage these relationships for my own benefit, I’ve got to actively work on maintain those relationships in order to maintain my status because they key to staying on top, well, the phrase is “What have you done for me lately?”

So along comes Twitter.   Twitter is great.  Twitter is love.  For the social media lover in me, I can’t get enough of Twitter.  It means I can follow people I met at BarCamps, keep up with what is going on in the wiki community, possibly get some traffic for the site I run, can network with people who might have leads for work for me, can interact with news organizations in a way that I haven’t before.

Except, well, for all the great things Twitter does for that, it doesn’t do much for me as a member of fandom.  Fandom is all about relationships remember.  It is one thing to follow a person and comment, but that’s not enough in fandom.  You need to have more focus and extended conversations.  The Twitter format just doesn’t allow for that.  It is too short to adequately share love of the source with or to hold conversations with others.  If you do try to have extended conversations on Twitter, if you’re not providing value to others who follow you, you could lose followers.  Ick.

One of my friends has other issues which put her off Twitter as a member of fandom. Twitter is very immediate.  You can’t hold conversations over an extended period of time because the format doesn’t lend itself to that.  If I am out on Thursday and miss the new episode of CSI and my friend watched it, we can catch up on AIM or blog about it a couple of days later, when we have the time.  Twitter doesn’t allow that.  And when your relationship is dependent on that shared material, the inability to slow the flow of conversation on your own terms?  It can be bad news.

Another friend has issues with some of the comments on Twitter being so banal and unrelated to why they care about the person.  They don’t care that you just woke up, that you’re eating breakfast, that you landed at Heathrow, etc.  They don’t care that you are having a conversation with SEO with some one on Twitter that teaches you a lot. (I get this a lot from my fandom friends on Twitter.  Especially when I start having conversations with people they don’t follow.  They’ve considered unfollowing me because I do that so often.)  What are they getting out of their relationship with me when I do that?

Another issue that comes up is content.  Why follow me on Twitter for news about what I am doing fannishly when you can keep up with that on Fan History’s blog, my LiveJournal or on Fan History’s InsaneJournal asylum?  The information is better, more detailed and easier to follow.  It is easier to keep up to date because the content is much more focused.  The blog is going to be about fandom.  The posts will be once a day.  You’re not going to have to filter around my other random content.  If content is king, then Twitter, unless carefully focused, mostly includes links and doesn’t involve loads of engagement that is off putting, then well, Twitter fails.  Content on Twitter isn’t king when it comes to relationship maintenance.

So relationships that are dependent on Twitter end up feeling shallow, where they feel hard to leverage for your relationships to faciliate your enjoyment of canon and accomplish your goals in fandom.  Things feel even more confusing when Twitter appears to require a large follow list to be viewed as important on or influential on Twitter (and in fandom).  How can you have relationships with people that are meaningful, that give you something back, when you can’t actively engage people because the “content” disappears so quickly and could easily be missed?  In terms of my fandom relationships, I find I can’t maintain them like I can in other places.  I end up having to play catch up with Twitter by reading their Tweets when daily summaries are posted to their LiveJournals.

In the end, what this means for me is I, and a number of my fannish acquaintances, haven’t figured out how to use Twitter for our fannish enjoyment. Yes, I know how to use it to promote my projects. Yes, I love it for networking professionally. I understand how to use it to monitor reputations and get celebrity and entertainment news. I’ve found some great Chicago related social media events. Fandom though… still a problem and I can’t see it changing.

My fandom’s fan fiction community is dying…

November 24th, 2008

My fandom’s fan fiction community is dying. Or at least, it appears that way. I’ve chatted with a friend as to why it appears like the Grissom/Sara, other Sara and other Grissom related parts seem to having much less activity. I feel like I half know but I just also feel the need to whine about it because I miss waking up every morning to one, two, possibly three stories (or chapters) by authors that I love. It was kind of like my morning cup of coffee.

Anyway, the conclusion appears to be that the strike, coupled with cast changes, were the primary culprits. The long wait between new episodes, not liking the uncertainty of what was happening, rumors that were unpleasant and then that actual cast change? It just makes keeping up interests hard. This was coupled with a number of the bigger and better writers having off-line issues. They got married, had long term illnesses, had family changes because of foster children entering their lives, moved across the country, etc. They haven’t recovered from those situations yet or, if they have, they aren’t as interested in them as they were before.

I’d like to see it recover for totally selfish reasons. I love some authors and I miss reading their stories. I love the sense of community. I’m better able to participate in it when it is active. I have a good reason to keep up with people. But even given that, I can’t see myself caring that much if they suddenly all the authors I loved became really active again just because I don’t care about the show like I used to… Cast changes, you know?

CSI fandom, canon and me

August 26th, 2008

I love CSI and I love the fandom.  There are some truly fantastic people involved in the fan community.  The show itself rocks hardcore.  Because of the quality of the source material, the fans have a lot to work with.  It is one of the reasons I love the show and its fandom.

Totally excited about the new season premiere.  I’ve watched the trailer about 10 times on YouTube and courtesy of TiVo catching the trailer on an episode of Big Brother.  Sara’s back! It might only be for an episode (actually two if the spoilers for the season are right) but Sara has been my reason to watch the show almost from the start.  It gives the show some continuity plot wise.  It makes the show more believable.  And with the potential for some Grissom/Sara moments…  YEAH!  I’m hoping that my favorite fan fiction writers will be inspired to write and write more and give me post episode wonderfulness.

Because there hasn’t been much wonderfulness.  I was chatting with one of my best fandom friends who writes work I absolutely adore.  Both of us are big Sara Sidle fans.  She’s also a big Gil Grissom fan.  The departure of Jorja Fox, the lack of her appearing on the show consistently because of that departure, the lack of Jora Fox being on television on a weekly basis the news that William Petersen is leaving the show, the rumors that Gil Grissom might pick up with another woman, Gary Dourdan leaving, Warrick Brown dying, new characters coming in, Ronie Lake not appearing much after being brought in, other cast change rumors, Catherine/Warrick not having been dealt with much before he died, these all add up together to make it hard to find inspiration to create fanworks based on CSI.  Canon is bound to have so many changes and things are so unresolved now in a way that is uncomfortable.  …   Uncomfortable rather than exciting.  Babylon 5′s plot which could involve people dying or disappearing or totally changing was exciting.  You wanted to see these changes.  CSI is not.  It is episodic television to a degree.  It isn’t arc driven.  It is, at times, character driven.  The changes going on thus aren’t pleasurable and something that makes me want to watch.  So yeah.  Not inspired.  I’m likely to watch but not with the same committment.  (And thanks to the power of TiVo, if I miss an episode, no big deal.  If some one says it is exciting, I can go back and watch it later.)  I just… wish it wasn’t this way because I love my Grissom/Sara fan fiction.  I love my community.  I love my canon.   Others seem to be drifting or less interested. If I lose that,  if others are less involved, I’ll be adrift with out a fandom and that will add to my fandom sadness.

While on the topic of CSI, I bought the CSI video game for my wii.  I figured it would be a nice extension of my love of CSI and help rekindle my interest.  The cast was on the cover. It was a wii game and wii seems much more exciting than the PC version.  The game sadly makes no use of the niftiness of the wii.  For Sara Sidle, the voice isn’t that of Jorja Fox.  Woe. :(   Not an awesome game and doesn’t look like it will accomplish my goal in having bought it.  Wish I had read the reviews before I purchased.

StartUp Alpha pitch session

August 16th, 2008

On Tuesday, I did a pitch session at StartUp Alpha’s event in NYC. I figured it was good exposure for Fan History, and a great learn by doing opportunity. I didn’t believe that we’d hook up with a venture capitalist there. (Though if it had happened, I would not have turned it down.) Two nights in New York City to do that, the cost wasn’t bad.

  $340.00 for airfare to New York City
   $35.50 for train from EWR to NYC
   $23.00 for MTA pass
   $94.00 for hostel for two nights
   $16.20 for book about fandom
    $7.64 for breakfast at ORD
    $5.41 for breakfast in NYC
    $7.14 for lunch in NYC
    $3.63 for snack in NYC
    $7.04 for breakfast at EWR
    $2.00 for CTA to downtown Chicago
    $5.65 for train home from Chicago
    $3.29 for food in Chicago at Wiki Wednesday, Chicago
  $550.50 Total for Startupalpha.com pitch and party expenses

Really affordable if you’re a startup and looking for VC pitching experience, another reason to network and to meet more people who are doing their own start ups. Kept costs down by staying in a hostel which ran about $47 a night, rather than $250 at a hotel. One night, I had a room mate who snored but with a hostel, that’s a risk and I slept through it. The next night, some one came in at 1am. Still, not bad. (This was the Candy Hostel.) I took MTA, flew into Newark, took a train into the city. Those things also helped keep the costs down.

While there, I talked to some one from femalethiink.com and I owe them an e-mail.  I also met Roger from klickable.tv which looks to be a very cool project.  From how it was described, it reminded me a bit of a video version of like.com and LiveJournal’s celebritystyle community rolled into a collaborative environment where people can comment on and offer additional links.  As some one who has SQUEE! moments over clothing on shows I love(d) like CSI and Boston Public, being able to click on clothes that my favorite characters are wearing and to learn more about them… just awesome.  It would also be another great way to find a community of like minded fans.  (And for shows like Lipstick Jungle and Sex in the City… considering how central clothes are to the show…)  I can’t wait to see more of it.

Great trip overall.  It was affordable.  It was a learning and networking experience.

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