Posts Tagged ‘bandfic’

Sports fan fiction fandom

June 9th, 2009

I found this on my hard drive. It dates back to June 2006. In all the time I’ve been doing Fan History, I don’t know if I have expanded my knowledge of sportfic fandom beyond this much.


SportsFic history is something difficult to construct. If you’re in main stream fan fiction culture, you may never stumble upon it. If you’re in BandFic, ActorFic or PoliSlash communities, you are still probably unlikely to stumble upon it. It is and it isn’t. SportsFic is one of the smaller, less visible fannish communities.

Some fan fiction community dates are relatively easy to pin down. The Star Trek fan fiction community was started in 1967 with the publication of Spockanalia. The BandFic community date is harder to pin down but the zines were definitely present by the 1983 when Comet Bus was published. The Harry Potter fan fiction community was started by 1999 on FanFiction.Net. SportsFic lacks even this much clarity.

Sports was clearly defined as a fandom as early as 1908. [1] What this meant at that time in the context of sports is not the same as most modern fen would use the word. The technology to facilitate community was just not there. The tradition of writing fictional stories about real people in a sporting context was not there. [2] The community demographics of modern fandom that go to support fan fiction were not present. The culture that allowed writing of stories that featured sexually explicit stories was not there. It did not resemble fandom as most fen define it.

In the period between 1908 and 1950, histories of sports fan behavior and sports fandom do not describe anything that look like fan fiction. The first inkling of sports fandom involving fan fiction first emerged in the 1950s, in the post World War II era. This is the period when wrestling fiction began. [3] The wrestling community that created this material tended to be female, with some sixty percent of the audience to live events being composed of women and ninety percent of the television audience being female. This group of fen started creating their own fannish materials, including fanzines and the writing of fictional stories about real wrestling stars. They would continue on with this activity well into the 1960s. After that, the history of the community is some what neglected, with out much research done on the community.

Following wrestling fiction, there is a void of knowledge. [4] Was there sports fic going on? It seems highly probable given that bandfic was similar and had a tradition of putting fictional stories about band members into fanzines. And sports fandom had fanzines. There are tons of them to be found. In the period between 1960 and 1995, these included but are not limited to the following fanzines: Leyton Orientear, Scottish Athletic Journal, Foul!, Sick as a Parrot, Combat Sports, Fan-Club Bulletin, Paper Tiger and The Northern Light.

The internet proved to be a bit of a boon to SportsFic. For the first time, the material was more easily findable, more easily publishable and it was easier to people to find like minded fen. It also helped bring sportsfic communities into contact with other communities. There is important because unlike ActorFic and BandFic, there is no indication that SportsFic had contact with traditional media fan fiction communities prior to this and even for a number of years after the material was first put on-line. Sadly, like BandFic, it appears that the early other community contact that SportsFic had was with the erotica community. This community was found on Nifty in 1993.

From that early home, SportsFic appeared to go to Usenet. By 1997, figure skating, baseball, football began to discuss issues that laid a framework for story writing including speculation on athlete orientation, eating disorders and more. These discussions would result in such archives as SkateFic. The presence of the speculation lead to the creation of mailing lists and fan fiction archives located off Usenet. The SportsFic community was helped in 1998 with the creation of FanFiction.Net. While the archive did not set out to create a community where SportsFic could be posted, it hosted a number of SportsFic stories in the original and other categories. The ability to create free mailing lists also helped the nascent community. RS-X and FFN-Slashers-Unite were just two of the mailing lists that helped to expand the community. They also offered platforms to promote more specific communities. These mailing lists in turn begat a number of small, author centered fan fiction archives. Archives were considered large if they had twenty stories on them.

SportsFic became some what more tolerable in parts of the traditional media fan fiction community because of the ambiguity of some of the fandoms. Fan fiction based on professional wrestling was not quite real person fic like actorfic because the wrestlers were putting on a show for the fans, partially based on themselves but heavily scripted towards making it fiction. This ambiguity allowed SportsFic fen to put their material

When, in 2002, FanFiction.Net banned all real person fic, some parts of the SportsFic community reeled. The biggest communities that were affected were the baseball, wrestling and racing communities. What would rescue them would be the ease of creating mailing lists, new automated fan fiction archive scripts, low cost for web hosting and LiveJournal. LiveJournal’s role can not be understated. It created a number of communities that might otherwise not have existed or would have remained very small. These communities included horse racing, swimming, baseball, football, women’s basketball, women’s soccer, Nascar and Formula One, skiing, gymnastics, skeleton and curling. It was helped along in other areas by the creation of such archives as FanDomination.Net and FanWorks.Org.

All these different avenues of story sharing did not narrow down. Members of the SportsFic continued to post to LiveJournal, to mailing lists, to automated archives, and to personal fan fiction archives. This expanding of the horizons is probably the reason that, by 2003, SportsFic began to come to the attention of the athletes themselves and that legal issues. In March of 2003, FanDomination.Net would get a cease and desist letter from the representative of Andy Petitte. In 2005, an Ohio State University Buckeye women’s basketball saffic writer would receive a similar letter and be kicked out of the Buckeye booster club.

Even with all these things happening in the SportsFic community, the crossover with traditional media fan fiction communities did not happen. Most members of traditional media fan fiction communities seem blissfully unaware of SportsFic. SportsFic community members give the appearance of being aware of possible reactions to the material and not forcing it on unsuspecting people. Terms have migrated to SportsFic from traditional media fan fiction community including fan fiction, real person fic, Mary Sue and slash. Given the long period of isolation, it seems unlikely that sportsfic will ever fully integrate into the traditional media fan fiction community.

[1] Chicago Daily Tribune used the word fandom several times in the context of baseball fans.
[2] Roman-a-clef, what could be seen as a precursor for some real person fic, was being written but it tended to focus on literary figures.
[3] See: Fiske, John. Researching Historical Broadcast Audiences: Female Fandom of Professional Wrestling, 1945-1960. Diss. Univ. of Wisconsin – Madison, 1997. 5 Apr. 2006.
[4] For more information on the problem with fanzine histories, see: Hall, H. & Smith, N. (1997). You’ll wish it was all over: the bibliographic control of grey literature with reference to print football fanzines. Serials, 10(2), 189-194.

Follow up: Most human revised articles on Fan History

April 9th, 2009

The last post was heavy in terms of bot revised edits on Fan History. It is that way because our data collection bots update every day and some have been active since September 2008. This is the last of non-bot, human edited entries on Fan History.

The following data is cached, and was last updated 18:45, 9 April 2009.

Showing below up to 500 results starting with #1.

View (previous 500) (next 500) (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500)

  1. Harry Potter ?(291 revisions)
  2. Draco/Hermione ?(242 revisions)
  3. Bandfic ?(228 revisions)
  4. Beauty and the Beast ?(221 revisions)
  5. Digimon ?(219 revisions)
  6. Supernatural ?(219 revisions)
  7. CSI ?(214 revisions)
  8. Rescue Rangers ?(209 revisions)
  9. Doctor Who ?(200 revisions)
  10. X-Files ?(195 revisions)
  11. Main Page ?(190 revisions)
  12. Cassandra Claire ?(186 revisions)
  13. Organization for Transformative Works ?(184 revisions)
  14. Slash ?(157 revisions)
  15. Doctor Who fanzines ?(138 revisions)
  16. Star Trek ?(135 revisions)
  17. Bleach ?(132 revisions)
  18. Russell Crowe ?(122 revisions)
  19. Star Trek fanzines ?(121 revisions)
  20. AdultFanFiction.Net ?(119 revisions)
  21. Star Wars ?(118 revisions)
  22. Sailor Moon ?(118 revisions)
  23. The Police ?(115 revisions)
  24. Susan M. Garrett ?(114 revisions)
  25. Daiken ?(114 revisions)
  26. Lord of the Rings ?(113 revisions)
  27. LiveJournal ?(112 revisions)
  28. Mortal Instruments ?(107 revisions)
  29. Roswell ?(106 revisions)
  30. FanFiction.Net ?(106 revisions)
  31. Zelda ?(105 revisions)
  32. Duran Duran ?(103 revisions)
  33. The Forever Knight Fan Fiction Awards ?(101 revisions)
  34. Naruto ?(100 revisions)
  35. Msscribe ?(99 revisions)
  36. Avatar: The Last Airbender ?(97 revisions)
  37. Mlina ?(95 revisions)
  38. Lucia de’Medici ?(95 revisions)
  39. Warcraft ?(95 revisions)
  40. Draco/Ginny ?(95 revisions)
  41. Final Fantasy VII ?(94 revisions)
  42. Current events ?(91 revisions)
  43. Grissom/Sara ?(89 revisions)
  44. Canadian Idol ?(89 revisions)
  45. Fan fiction archives ?(89 revisions)
  46. Gundam Wing ?(87 revisions)
  47. Plagiarism ?(86 revisions)
  48. Race Fail 2009 ?(86 revisions)
  49. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer ?(86 revisions)
  50. Xena: Warrior Princess ?(85 revisions)
  51. Twilight ?(85 revisions)
  52. My Chemical Romance ?(83 revisions)
  53. X-men ?(82 revisions)
  54. Thunderbirds ?(79 revisions)
  55. Hey Arnold! ?(78 revisions)
  56. Tikatu ?(78 revisions)

Most revised articles on Fan History

April 9th, 2009

We discovered today that Special:MostRevisions won’t load 95% of the time because it just takes too long to load. That’s what happens with over a million and a half edits. Before we cache it and it no longer updates, I thought I would present to you that list of the top 50 most edited articles. A lot of these are bot updated daily so counting them seems a bit iffy… but that’s neither here nor there. now for the list:

Pages with the most revisions

From Fan History Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Showing below up to 50 results starting with #1.

  1. Harry Potter ?(291 revisions)
  2. Draco/Hermione ?(242 revisions)
  3. Zoey101 (LiveJournal) size/table ?(229 revisions)
  4. Bandfic ?(228 revisions)
  5. Beauty and the Beast ?(221 revisions)
  6. Supernatural ?(219 revisions)
  7. Digimon ?(219 revisions)
  8. CSI ?(214 revisions)
  9. Rescue Rangers ?(209 revisions)
  10. Harry Potter fan fiction community size/table ?(205 revisions)
  11. NCIS fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  12. Naruto fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  13. Avatar: Last Airbender fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  14. Bleach fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  15. Twilight fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  16. Death Note fan fiction community size/table ?(204 revisions)
  17. House MD fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  18. Inuyasha fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  19. Supernatural fan fiction community size/table ?(203 revisions)
  20. Fandom tracking/table ?(202 revisions)
  21. Bones fan fiction community size/table ?(202 revisions)
  22. CSI fan fiction community size/table ?(202 revisions)
  23. Doctor Who fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  24. D.Gray-Man fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  25. Wrestling fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  26. Pokemon fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  27. Heroes fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  28. Maximum Ride fan fiction community size/table ?(201 revisions)
  29. CSI: New York fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  30. Prince of Tennis fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  31. Shugo Chara! fan fiction community size/table ?(200 revisions)
  32. Doctor Who ?(200 revisions)
  33. Stargate: SG-1 fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  34. Total Drama Island fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  35. Vampire Knights fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  36. One Piece fan fiction community size/table ?(199 revisions)
  37. Chronicles of Narnia fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  38. Bis(s) fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  39. Hannah Montana fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  40. Katekyo Hitman Reborn! fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  41. South Park fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  42. Stargate: Atlantis fan fiction community size/table ?(198 revisions)
  43. Code Geass fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  44. Criminal Minds fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  45. Yu-Gi-Oh fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  46. One Tree Hill fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  47. Ouran High School Host Club fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  48. Sailor Moon fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  49. Fullmetal Alchemist fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)
  50. Buffy: The Vampire Slayer fan fiction community size/table ?(197 revisions)

Well ouch. MySpace turns super fan unfriendlier…

December 30th, 2008

MediaPost is reporting that MySpace has come up with a new way of dealing with infringing fans. Instead of DMCA takedown notices, cease and desist letters, etc., companies can now overlay the content on your MySpace contributions with their own advertisements:

Once a site publisher enables Auditude, every piece of content gets a unique ID. First, a content owner has to supply Auditude with copies of all content it wants “fingerprinted,” and Auditude adds it to a database. Once deployed on MySpace, for example, the technology can scan every digital file queued for uploading to see if there’s a match within the indexed content. It can then take any action the content company prefers, including blocking the upload. MTV Networks is one of the first entertainment companies to sign up for the MySpace service – and it’s going the ad route for content from BET, Nickelodeon and Comedy Central.

That kind of sucks the big one. It probably helps explain why MySpace has never really caught on big with hardcore fandom who have instead opted for services like LiveJournal, FaceBook, Quizilla, FanFiction.Net, YouTube, etc. Well, that and a number of teen fandom friends I have music wise were put off when they posted their bandfic, bandslash when they were contacted by people that they characterized as pedophiles.

That sort of heavy handed tactic could result in a loss of people tuning in to MySpace because it is hugely intrusive and doesn’t offer any form of recourse. (Of course, considering that MySpace offers some unique things that you can’t get elsewhere and a lot of people won’t ever notice that, and it will help MySpace with their revenue stream, I can’t see any change happening to dissuade media companies from responding this way to alleged copyright violations. )

Canonical URL by SEO No Duplicate WordPress Plugin